Blog Griffin Theatre 2018 Program launch

Griffin Theatre 2018 Program launch

Posted Sept. 4, 2017, 10:50 a.m. by T

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Griffin Theatre 2018 Program launch

National Art School

Darlinghurst, Sydney, AU

August 28, 2017

Griffin Theatre Company is an Australian theatre specialising in new writing, based in Sydney. It is the resident theatre company at the SBW Stables Theatre in Kings Cross and the only professional theatre company in Sydney entirely dedicated to the development and production of new Australian writing for the stage.

2018 at Griffin is a year of urgent voices, intense experiences and the extraordinary visions of Australian playwrights.

The conversations inspired by these plays are meant to confront and provoke question.

Witty, incisive and at times ferocious, each play is written by an Australian in response to the complicated present and hopeful future state of the Australian nation:

David Finnigan tackles the climate change ‘debate’ in Australia with his 2017 Griffin Award-winning play, Kill Climate Deniers

Kill Climate Deniers centres on a militant cell of eco-activists that takes the audience hostage during a concert at Parliament House. Led by charismatic spokeswoman Catch, they demand Australia immediately cease all carbon emissions and coal exports—or they’ll start executing their 1,700 hostages.

But they’re not the only ones to take the title literally. Between scenes of bloody action and banging ’90s tunes, writer David Finnigan discusses the outrage the play’s title provoked from Andrew Bolt and his cabal of conservative bloggers.

The original production was shut down in the ensuing shitstorm, leading Finnigan to eventually fold the scandal into the play.

Lee Lewis will direct this controversial take on the climate change ‘debate’ in Australia. It’s a play within a play, an action film inside a documentary, a satire inside a rave.  

Ever lived in a share-house? Good Cook. Friendly. Clean. is Brooke Robinson’s portrait of a woman slipping through the cracks of Sydney’s housing crisis. Funny until it’s not, Marion Potts directs this not always comfortable but timely play.

Where do you go when you don’t have a home?

Coming home one night, Sandra learns she has two weeks to move out. It’s nothing personal, her housemates just have a friend who needs somewhere to stay. No choice but to pack up and find another sharehouse. But Sandra is in her 50s. And affordable places are hard to find in the ruthless Sydney rental market. In one interview after another, she contorts herself into the shape of what she thinks people want in a housemate. But with each rejection she becomes increasingly desperate, losing control of her life in frighteningly simple ways.

Brooke Robinson has written an unflinching examination of homelessness, asking how willing we are, as a society, to take care of our most vulnerable.

The choices of a parent and child collide in Kendall Feaver’s The Almighty Sometimes, directed by Lee Lewis:

Anna has been medicated for a range of mood and behavioural disorders for as long as she can remember. Now she wants to know what life would be like without pills and prescriptions.

As Anna tries to find out who she really is, her mother, Renee (played by Hannah Waterman), remains determined to protect her. She can’t bear to watch her daughter go through the anguish all over again, to throw it all away for a personal experiment—but Anna’s treatment is no longer her decision.

Winner of the Judges’ Award in the prestigious Bruntwood Prize for Playwriting (UK), Kendall Feaver’s play is a compelling study of a young woman trying to discover where her illness ends and her identity begins.

Nick Coyle’s The Feather in the Web is an unpredictable and hilarious take on infatuation and self-discovery. Directed by Ben Winspear, the play skewers our obsession with couples and careers, asking just how much we’re willing to give (and lose) for love:

Kimberly is a character like no other. She’s powerful, wicked, in control—but she has no voice. So she sets out to find it, leaving a trail of car crashes and crying people in her wake. Then she meets Miles. And she’ll do anything he says.

From engagement parties to team-building weekends to improv comedy, The Feather in the Web is an unpredictable take on infatuation and self-discovery.

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Photos by KAVV

 

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