Staff Cheryl

Cheryl

Senior Staff Writer

London

Cheryl's last content update – April 26, 2016, 2:28 p.m.

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Cheryl's most recent reviews
Oranssi Pazuzu - Värähtelijä album cover

Oranssi Pazuzu

Värähtelijä, 2016

8.5 / 10

Värähtelijä marks Oranssi Pazuzu’s fourth foray into the outer reaches and the Finnish band pull no punches in creating a record that melds tripped out cosmic rhythms with the distinct ...

Skepticism  - Ordeal album cover

Skepticism

Ordeal, 2015

9.0 / 10

Recording a live album isn’t a new concept, but for Skepticism, who don’t do anything by halves, recording their brand new album completely live, was certainly a new experience. The ...

Locrian - Infinite Dissolution album cover

Locrian

Infinite Dissolution, 2015

8.5 / 10

Locrian’s approach to metal is to disassemble the core structures, push them further away from their crude beginnings and delve into building them back up again into towering walls of ...

Sick/Tired - Dissolution  album cover

Sick/Tired

Dissolution , 2014

7.5 / 10
200 Words Or Less

Sick/Tired don’t mess about. They’re angry, and they want you to know about it and they do so via the medium of fast, raw grindcore. The Chicago band pound through ...

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Cheryl's most recent features
City States

One Question Interviews City States

Posted Sept. 30, 2015, 12:16 a.m.

Joel (City States) SPB: How do you find the time to work on so many projects and do your regular day job (if you have one)?  Joel: At the risk ...

Northumbria

One Question Interviews Northumbria

Posted April 6, 2015, 3:06 a.m.

Dorian Williamson (Northumbria) SPB: You recorded your first album in a church - what was it about the space that appealed to you and what kind of spaces would you like ...

Rome

One Question Interviews Rome

Posted April 6, 2015, 3:03 a.m.

Jerome Reuter (Rome) SPB: You're playing some anniversary shows this year and visiting some interesting places - How did you decide which countries to play in?  Reuter: I have to ...

AMSG 666

One Question Interviews AMSG 666

Posted Jan. 11, 2015, 11:29 p.m.

AngelFukk Witchhammer (AMSG 666) SPB: How important is Satan to you/the band and what does that belief mean to you? Witchhammer: Luciferianism for me is breathing /living each day ...

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Cheryl's most recent news stories
1QI: Phobia, Moonraker, The Blind Pets, Bad Cop/Bad Cop

Bands 1QI: Phobia, Moonraker, The Blind Pets, Bad Cop/Bad Cop

Posted April 26, 2016, 2:28 p.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview four days each week, typically every Monday-Thursday ...

Shane Mclachlan (Phobia)
SPB: What is the most thankless job in the music industry?
Shane: Well, as for me being a vocalist, I'm the guy everybody wants to talk shit on, spit on, and blame everything on. Nobody fucks with the bass player: he is always the nice guy. So my job is thankless in the sense of not being thanked for the passion and integrity to write lyrics and go up on stage and sing them and being able to influence a lot of people in a positive way... But then if somebody takes it the wrong way and they shoot themselves, you're fucked!
Nick Sucks (Moonraker – bass/vocals)
SPB: Basements or bars?
Nick: Both. They both have their appeals and drawbacks. Basements are normally DIY and all ages, essentially a subterranean house show. Since we live in California, we love to play basements because those types of shows are pretty rare here. Cops aren't usually called because of the sound being contained in the basement. That also means the hardcore band that somehow drilled a tunnel large enough to get their ridiculous 8x10 bass cab down there will be destroying your ears. The PA sound quality is normally nonexistent as well but that's not what you go to a basement show for anyway. You're there to get just as sweaty as the band and scream out every word to a song you don't even know the lyrics to in the most intimate space.
Bars are alright but you definitely remember the good ones: if the house music is rad or the bartender has a Lawrence Arms tattoo or just fun regulars, all cool things you look for in a bar you play. Unfortunately bars can't do all ages shows which kinda sucks. Normally the bar also has to take a cut if there was a cover charge. You also run the risk of playing a bar that didn't know what they were doing and thought punk meant you would play mostly covers of Sublime and The Offsping's later discography.
The best place I can recommend is the best of both worlds: The Millhill Basement in Trenton, New Jersey. A punk rock dive bar in a basement where the bartenders are rad and we normally drink way too much. Cheap drinks, stickers everywhere, and music that reverberates off the concrete walls loud as fuck. Go there.
Joshua Loggan (The Blind Pets – guitar/vocals)
SPB: What do you like to do on a tour off-day?
Joshua: Anything outdoors! I absolutely love to swim or see something new. Best day off I have ever had was at Earthquake Lake in Yellowstone with my band and a fat sack of chronic! GOOD TIMES!
Stacey Dee (Bad Cop/Bad Cop)
SPB: How did you hook up with Fat?
Stacey: I was playing pool with Fat Mike after a Loved Ones show that my old band opened for.  We were at the Eagle in San Francisco.  I made him a bet and if I won he was to write a song I got to sing on.  He was kicking my ass and about to knock in the 8 Ball.  I leaned over and whispered "big beautiful titties" in his ear.  He scratched on the 8 Ball and I won!  
Mike doesn't welch on bets.  He was writing the Home Street Home musical and called me in to try out for it.  I sang with everything I had and secured the roll of Sue.  I spent the next 5 years working on the musical.  During a studio session we discussed how there wasn't any women representing the label.  He and Soma discussed putting out a 7" of Bad Cop / Bad Cop.  But, he wanted to see us first.  They came to our show, which was with the most fab drag queens in SF and they loved it.  When I got off stage he said he was gonna put out that 7".  The next day I got a call saying we were getting signed to Fat.  It was my life's dream!  

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1QI: Damaged City Festival, Brian Cullman, Nomads, DSGNS

Bands 1QI: Damaged City Festival, Brian Cullman, Nomads, DSGNS

Posted April 17, 2016, 3:46 a.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview four days each week, typically every Monday-Thursday ...

Damaged City Fest (April 7-10)
SPB:Festivals are a continually popular concept, though varying in formulas. What do you think is best about a festival versus a “regular” line-up of 3-5 bands?
Nick and Chris: We don't see festivals as an "alternative" to normal shows and prefer to view the two types of events as separate entities. I think if every single show was a festival, people would get pretty burned out. Both of us (Chris and Nick) have always set up normal shows and we'll always continue. 
I think the advantage to festivals are primarily their scale. The larger turnout of people can help finance bigger headliners and help pay for international bands that probably couldn't afford to come otherwise. Festivals also act as a meeting point for punks to congregate from all over the world. Fests also make it easier for DIY bands to plan tours and help gain some security about traveling in from long distances. Again, it has never been our intention to "replace" the traditional 4 band show with a fest. I think, if anything, there are many many many more "normal shows" as a direct result of the fest. 
Brian Cullman
SPB: After working in film, journalism, and other aspects of the industry, what called you back to performing and recording original music?
Brian: I love working in movies, but there’s a part of the process that is just soul-destroying. On most movies, even low budget ones, there’s so much money involved, and so many people who need to be pleased, that you spend more time and energy trying not to get things wrong than in making something that’s really right and that shines with its own light. I finally got fed up with being a musical waitress -- “More drama, Mr DeMille? More comedy?” -- and went back to making my own decisions, making recordings that I myself wanted to hear. And it’s been a pleasure.
Though in fairness, every once in a while I had the chance to work with a director who didn’t need a committee and who trusted their own judgment, and that was a gas. Working with Stanley Tucci was so much fun and so uplifting. He loves music, he knows where music comes from, and at various times I had to physically hold him back and keep him from running into the studio and hugging the musicians while we were recording.
Mocaine (Nomads)
SPB: What’s the worst job you’ve ever had?
Mocaine: When I was 19 years old I got laid off from my record store job and had to scramble to find work. I got a job at a sex shop attached to a strip club in downtown Seattle. Thought I was gonna be doing retail. Ends up I was hired as the "Skeet Sweeper." Job requirements: hose homeless people’s shit out of the alley in the morning and once an hour hit the jerk booths with a mop. Lasted three weeks there. I quit the day someone took a shit in one of the jerk booths. Cum sucks. 
DSGNS
SPB: What’s the smallest crowd you’ve ever played to? Is it hard when such a thing happens and how do you adjust?
DSGNS: The smallest crowd we’ve ever played for was about 5 maybe 8, can’t be too sure. It can sometimes be a bit of a hit to your ego, and the band morale may wane a bit. For us once the music starts it doesn’t really matter if we have a crowd of 5 or 5,000 watching us, the same amount of heart and aggression will be on display.

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1QI:  Black Black Black,  Hunx & His Punx, Topshelf Records, James Burns

Bands 1QI: Black Black Black, Hunx & His Punx, Topshelf Records, James Burns

Posted April 5, 2016, 1:20 p.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview four days each week, typically every Monday-Thursday ...

Black Black Black
SPB: How do you approach writing/recording a song with a guest vocalist, such as “Let’s Bloodlet” with Dave Curran? 
Jason Byers (vocals): Dave and I have been friends for over 20 years. We first met in Cleveland, Ohio at the legendary Speak in Tongues venue in 1995. Dave was on tour playing bass with Unsane. My band Disengage was just starting out and got the opportunity to open the show for them. Eventually Disengage played many more shows with Unsane and toured the States with Dave’s other band, Players Club. We kept in contact through the years. I’ve always been a big fan of his vocals. 
When Black Black Black was recording the self-titled record I heard a good spot for some back-up vocals. I called Dave and he came in did it in one take. When I wrote the lyrics and melodies to “Let’s Bloodlet” I imagined his vocals alternating with mine. Once again Dave came in and made the song perfect. Who else would you get to sing an updated version about the process of bleeding someone to health? I also love hearing him scream the word “equestrian.” Ridiculously funny.
Jacob Cox (guitar): I / we have been friends with Dave for a really long time. I fondly remember having many many special moments with him on stage, and especially off. "Let’s Bloodlet" was chosen since it lent itself well to a call and response type vocal. It was a true joy to watch Dave perform Jason's lyrics, somehow making them even more poignant and powerful to me.
Seth Bogart (ex- Hunx & His Punx)
SPB: Do you read press written about you?
Seth: I guess if I see it and it starts off not totally boring or I feel like I did an interview and said something juicy, then yes.
Seth Decoteau (Topshelf Records)
 
SPB: Do you accept demos? What is the most suprising demo you've received? 
Seth: [Yes.]
I'd say the most surprising demo we've received was from Infinity Girl, which we ended up releasing. 
James Burns (Let's Go to Hell: Scattered Memories of the Butthole Surfers)
SPB: In a book such as this, do you aim to capture the spirit of the band as a whole, or via specific windows in time? 
James: The Butthole Surfers existed in a time when there was no internet, and literally no way of promoting yourself other than to just get out on the road and DO IT. They toured pretty much nonstop for three whole years to get themselves known. And while it certainly is easier to get yourself noticed today, it is also a lot more difficult, in some ways, to separate yourself from the pack.
What inspires me, even now, about the Butthole Surfers’ story is their perseverance. There was very little hope when they started that the band would ever be successful, and yet, they willed it into being by simply refusing to quit, despite all the odds being against them.
The older one gets, the more one realizes that times don’t change very much: politics, society, art. It’s like the Big Boys’ song says: “Punk rock’s not so far removed from Little Richard or the early Stones.” And while each generation has its own cross to bear, the spirit of independence, creativity, and willingness to fight for one’s art, or beliefs, is timeless.

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1QI: Cherry, Southpaw Records, France Camp, Wall of Youth Records

Bands 1QI: Cherry, Southpaw Records, France Camp, Wall of Youth Records

Posted March 23, 2016, 2:21 p.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview four days each week, typically every Monday-Thursday ...

Russell Edling (Cherry)
SPB: What was your first show?
Russell: It was July 1999, I was 11. The show was an all-day thing called "Suckfest," run by a local guy in Barnesville, PA.
Pretty much every band within 30 miles came and played. I was blown away, I saw this band called Nine Lives from NY that I thought were awesome, and a band from Freeland, PA called Team Radar. I was there because my oldest sister Lori (she also did the Gloom artwork!) was friends with the guy who ran the show.
 
Rob Fales (Southpaw Records)
SPB: Have you ever rejected album art from a band or artist? What goes into that process/decision?
Rob: Yes, we've rejected album art from bands. It's not something we do too often, only two that I can recall. There was a Sandwitches record we removed a penis from (for obvious reasons). Then there was the album art for Sam Coffey and The Iron Lungs Gates Of Hell that we rejected. The original artwork for Sam Coffey was very gothic and it made the album look like a metal record. For a band that sounds like a mix of The Exploding Hearts and Meatloaf we didn't see the connection and figured other people wouldn't either. When we asked the band if we could change it they were more than happy to do. We decided with the band to hire an artist to illustrate the cover.
 
France Camp
SPB: Who is the most overrated musician/band of all time?
Frane Camp: Charles "the man" Manson. Not a big fan of his music, really dug his side project lol
I'm giving you two.
2nd answer: Our answer would have to be Devin Gregory and the Fire Department.
There’s a band that took off in the ‘90s and really hit the ground running with their single "Take Me to the Station" and "Wake Up (The House is on Fire)," but they failed to gain traction with their sophomore EP "Dalmatian Sunday." Things took a turn for the worse in ‘92 when lead singer left to pursue heavy opiates, but I know they have been topping charts across the world with their newest trash "I'm Retired, but Still Have Nightmares" and "Wife is gone (I'm a Hero)."
Yuck, no thanks. 
 
Eric (Wall of Youth Records)
SPB: If you could universally fix one recurring issue in venues across the world, what would you fix?
Eric: If I had my way, which never seems to happen, I would make the floors of all venues sloped slightly down toward the stage. I'm a pretty tall person so I always feel like a total asshole when I am anywhere but the back of the room. Which I never am, so I always feel like a total asshole. You see the problem. If the floors sloped down then all the shorter people behind me would still be able to see over my head. I've been to a few places like that and it was great. Of course that sort of revision would require a bunch of construction so let's just go with "free beer." Final answer.

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Cheryl's most recent blogposts

Paradise Lost @ KOKO

Posted Oct. 11, 2015, 5:26 a.m. by Cheryl

Paradise Lost w/Tribulation and Lucifer October 4th @ KOKO, London Hype surrounding a band is either indicative of said band being incredibly talented and worth your time, or, on the ...

Caïna @ The Unicorn

Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 3:25 p.m. by Cheryl

Caïna, Hordes, Barshasketh The Unicorn London, UK September 6 2013 We've been talking a lot about the rebirth of Caïna of late and we'll soon have a review of the new ...

Winterfylleth @ The Black Heart

Posted Jan. 29, 2013, 7:50 a.m. by Cheryl

The tiny Black Heart in Camden holds court to an evening of droned out sludge, traditional heavy doom, and more English black metal than you can shake a stick at ...

Show Review: The Great Old Ones w/Terzij de Horde and Oblivionized @ The Unicorn, London (January 5th 2013)

Posted Jan. 9, 2013, 12:17 a.m. by Cheryl

The Unicorn is suffering from a severe lack of air con tonight, the tension in the air made all the palpable by the insane levels of heat and the anticipation ...

Cheryl's bio

"Without music, life would be a mistake."
Writer. SPB Social Media Contributor. 

I also like coffee and film and cats. 

Cheryl's personal URL

http://twitter.com/Cheryl_Prime

Cheryl's SPB contributions

108 reviews 23 features 133 news posts 6 blogposts
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