Staff Cheryl Prime

Cheryl Prime

Senior Staff Writer

London

Cheryl Prime's last content update – Oct. 21, 2014, 3:42 p.m.

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Cheryl Prime's most recent reviews
Empty Yard Experiment - Kallisti album cover

Empty Yard Experiment

Kallisti, 2014

7.5 / 10

Music is wonderful and is one of the few things that echoes across the world and can bring people together in unity. Of course, that’s putting the most simplistic of ...

City States - Geography album cover

City States

Geography, 2014

7.5 / 10

They say that good things come to those that wait and for City States and their main member Joel Ebner, it's certainly true. Ebner has spent many years creating and ...

The Great Old Ones - Tekeli-Li album cover

The Great Old Ones

Tekeli-Li, 2014

8.5 / 10

The incredible nature of The Great Old Ones majestic, sweeping and downright epic black metal was devastatingly apparent on their debut Al Azif - a record that saw them take ...

Benjamin Shaw - Goodbye, Cagoule World album cover

Benjamin Shaw

Goodbye, Cagoule World, 2014

7.0 / 10

The UK is a miserable place at times, more often than not in fact, and artists such as Benjamin Shaw fully embrace that misery and spin it out in stories ...

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Cheryl Prime's most recent features
Samothrace

One Question Interviews Samothrace

Posted March 30, 2014, 9:54 p.m.

Bryan Spinks (Samothrace, vocalist/guitarist) SPB: How did you get so bloody heavy? Spinks: I suppose it is a culmination of some different things. Obviously the riffs have to be ...

Mothlite

One Question Interviews Mothlite

Posted March 16, 2014, 11:10 a.m.

Daniel O’ Sullivan (Mothlite) SPB: How do you find the time for so many different projects? O'Sullivan: I don't find the time because time doesn't exist. It ...

Lunaire

One Question Interviews Lunaire

Posted Dec. 11, 2013, 8:14 a.m.

Lunaire SPB: Earlier this year you posted a picture of your drum kit in a basketball hall - is that the strangest place you've ever recorded, and if not, where ...

Caïna

Interviews Caïna

Posted Nov. 30, 2013, 5:12 p.m.

Let's go back to 2011, to when Andy Curtis-Brignell signed the death warrant for his solo, black metal of sorts project, Caïna. We spoke about it at length ...

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Cheryl Prime's most recent news stories
1QI:Hank 3, Doomtree, Withdrawal, Lycus

Bands 1QI:Hank 3, Doomtree, Withdrawal, Lycus

One of our features here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview ...

Hank III
SPB: Who has the best “metal voice” of all time?
Hank: To me Oderus Urungus because of his approach was a bit more unique and different and he is for sure in my top 5 singers of all time....
Sims (Doomtree)
SPB: If you could get any producer you haven’t worked with to provide beats for a song, who would you pick?
Sims: If I could work with anyone I suppose it'd be Kanye West. I think he's one of the most talented composers in the world. His vision for how songs should build, layer, and decay is absolutely incredible. And I feel like he gets the best out of the people he's working with. 
Runners up: Hudson Mohawke, DJ Shadow, DJ Quick
Adam Dyson (Withdrawal)
SPB:How do you choose your album art?
Adam: I've always felt that the artwork and presentation of a record is just as crucial as the music contained on it. It's important because it immediately sets a mood, and the recorded music itself fulfils the pre-conceived feelings you'd get looking at the cover. We're lucky that we have a support group of likeminded artists who are interested in expression through imagery with the same passion that we have for music. Often, I'll bounce ideas off them based on the feel the record gives off, or a central theme of the songs. Or sometimes not. "Faith, Flesh & Blood" was about offering everything about yourself to someone, but with the artwork that we worked with on Give Up (ingivingup.blogspot.ca) we just went for straight up religious smut. He'll be working with us on our new LP. Price isn't an issue; we've lost money making cardstock, silver embossed covers, glow in the dark and invisible ink covers. Anything to be different and interesting. Above all, support look for artwork that is original and evocative.
Jackson Heath (Lycus, guitar/vocals)
SPB: You manage to build an impressive atmosphere in your records which also enhances your lyrical themes. What inspires your lyrics?
Jackson: Having done politically-tinged lyrics in the past, we nowadays are focusing on looking inward and writing based on personal experiences. There’s something special when you write about depression or tough times you’ve overcome and people connect to it. We all go through rough times, it’s just part of life. When it comes down to it, music is a source of catharsis for us. The lyrics should reflect this as well by channeling the obstacles life throws you and making something beautiful from it. 
In regards for other’s to contact in the doom realm, our buddies in Dispirit, Funerary, Forn, Noothgrush and Brainoil might be into it… Don’t have contact addresses for all of them but they all either have Facebook or Bandcamp pages. 
 

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1QI: Dethklok, Hop Along, Vegas, Hank 3

Bands 1QI: Dethklok, Hop Along, Vegas, Hank 3

Posted Oct. 13, 2014, 12:28 p.m.

One of our features here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview ...

Brendon Small (Metalocalypse)
SPB: Who has the best “metal voice” of all time?
Nathan Explosion: He's not a metal singer but he happens to have a very brutal voice: Harvey Fierestein. It's between him and Louis Armstrong. Easy. 
Hank III
SPB: When did you first decide that you want to make music for a living?
Hank 3: For me I got into music at a very young age.1st time I was on stage I was 10 years old backing up a band for a few songs. Playing drums and guitar was something I would always do 24/7 and worked my balls of to get where I am today with it.
T (Vegas)
SPB: How do you vary your songwriting approach between your different projects?
T: Most of the songs I've written blast through wounds and articulate a sense of longing and loss. I tend to become obsessed with a theme and it haunts me for years until eventually it is penned down. I do not believe in the "kiss of the muse" -- writing is work, pleasurable work. Generally, I need something to hang a song on: a presence and form. Women tend to be an endless source of inspiration for me in that regard.
Frances (Hop Along)
SPB: What was your best subject in grade school? 
Frances: My best subjects in grade school were English and Art, though I think that really depends on the teachers a lot of the time. History was amazing when the teachers were good. One history teacher almost ruined it for me because she used to bust me all the time for wearing goth clothes and spikey jewelry. She constantly sent me to the office and her lessons were boring as hell (although one time we were learning about Constantinople and she played that They Might Be Giants song--I respect her for that). There was a bully in that class too, he was the worst. 8th grade man, so glad I never have to go back. I never understand people who say they miss grade school. I had one great science teacher in 9th grade, Mr. Koch, he made it really interesting, you could tell he didn't take school TOO seriously. I think it's easier to actually learn things when teachers don't take school too seriously.  
I had one English teacher I couldn't stand, in 11th grade I think. That was the year I had to read Beowulf. I loathed that class. I've had teachers I also didn't appreciate until much later, especially in my college years. I didn't really get into poetry the way I am now until recently. In high school I thought I loved poetry, but I really just liked E.E. Cummings, Bukowski, and folk singers. My art teacher in high school was Ms. Wagner, and I don't know that I'd have this life in music (and certainly not in art) without her.  She got me into this great program that isn't around anymore, the Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Arts (PGSA) for Creative Writing and it changed a great deal of things for me. That's where I heard Cat Power and Belle and Sebastian for the first time, incidentally. She got me interested in attending MICA for college, too. She made it seem like I could really have a career making art if I wanted to (she was the only grade school teacher I had that told me that) and I'm forever grateful to her for believing in me and hounding me to try. She is far and away the greatest teacher I have ever had.  
I've never once had a math class I liked, though I've had some really nice teachers within that subject. I think I napped in almost all my math classes.

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1QI: War//Plague, Big Dick, Sweatshop Boys, Lair of the Minotaur

Bands 1QI: War//Plague, Big Dick, Sweatshop Boys, Lair of the Minotaur

Posted Oct. 1, 2014, 2:55 p.m.

One of our features here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview ...

Andy Lefton (War//Plague)
SPB; Minneapolis seems very engrained in your sound. How much of that is conscious? Is it purposeful, or does is just sort of happen through osmosis? Do you find the TC scene to be fairly supportive and/or conducive? Are their limitations or frustrations that come with being labeled a Minneapolis band?
Andy: It's completely organic. We don't wear the “Minneapolis sound” on our sleeve and we definitely don't strive for anything specific in that nature. I suppose we've been conditioned to our musical environment, so yes...that element has rubbed off on us.
The majority of us aren't from Minneapolis, but came here to do exactly what we're doing musically. Prior to War//Plague, we all came from other projects (Provoked, Calloused, Pontius Pilate, etc) and played a lot of the same shows together in the past: from the late ‘90s up until now and have always worked closely with the DIY punk community here. At this point, it's in our blood.
It's not frustrating to be labeled as a Minneapolis band, it's where we're from. Our music does tie into some sounds that are familiar, but our individual history also has a back story of playing music that was more similar to what's been cloned over that last couple decades. We wanted to make a statement through our music. Yes, that's cliché, but true. We can bust out any old D-beat riff and move onto the next one without a thought. But we want to dig deeper than that and create something that will have its own unique signature. 15 years ago was an amazing time to just rage and not look back. Our intentions are still the same...more than ever, but want to focus on why the angst is there and not simply write a record for the sake of writing a record. 
Big Dick
SPB: What do your parents think of your band name?
Johnny: My parents believe I haven't left my basement since 1997. I really have them going.
Dave: I tell my parents the band is called Big Richard…they have a very uncertain and vague idea of my hobbies anyway.
Itai (Sweatshop Boys)
SPB: If you had your choice, which band would you love to tour with? 
Itai: Touring with another band is a complex matter, which makes this question a bit difficult to answer. Should we choose a band that we really love or people that we know that we'll surely get along with? Our problem is we're pretty isolated from most of the action/attention, in every aspect. most of the my favorite bands are located thousands of miles away and we never met personally.
Having that said, Sonic Avenues is a no brainer as an answer: a perfect combination between a band that we really love and appreciate and a bunch of awesome individuals. It has been an absolute pleasure to host these guys in Israel--people here are still talking about how much fun we had together. I personally really miss hanging out with them, so I would definitely love to go on tour with them one of these days.
Steven Rathbone (Lair of the Minotaur)
SPB: Since your lyrical themes are also rooted in Greek mythology, what was it that attracted you on the subject? 
Steven: I have always been into mythology, also horror and science fiction. The Greek myths were once passed on through storytelling around the campfire. Now the campfire has been replaced with the television. And even though there are movies and TV programs about Greek myths, there is something lost in the human memory. The natural connection to these mythological and astrological archetypes seems to be nearly severed. 
The story of how there was a long period of peace on this planet. And then an evil influence took over. And that's the world we live in today. I thought metal music would be a good conduit for passing on these stories. The attraction also came from the original idea for the band...which was to make something pure. No bullshit, meat and potatoes, METAL! And the subject matter of monstrous beasts, war, and sorcery are perfect for metal lyrics. 

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1QI: Vapour Night, Hope Drone, True Widow, Chris Brokaw

Bands 1QI: Vapour Night, Hope Drone, True Widow, Chris Brokaw

Posted Sept. 24, 2014, 12:46 p.m.

One of our features here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview ...

Ali (Vapour Night)
SPB: What’s the last “grower” record you heard that didn’t impress on first listen but has, since, grown on you?
Ali: Burials by AFI. I love AFI but I found this album to be such a horrible disappointment on first listen. I've listened to the album lots of times since and I really like the first half now. The second half is still growing on me. 
Karl Hartwig (Hope Drone)
SPB: What is the feeling of the current Australian black metal climate? It seems that Brisbane is shaping up to be a kind of epicentre for the genre, and it would be interesting to hear thoughts from a band of that area. 
Karl: I can’t really comment on the Australian black metal climate, as I don’t believe Hope Drone are a part of it or any particular scene. While our influences include black metal, I personally do not feel that Hope Drone is a black metal band, or even a metal band at all, but I am sure the many people who hear us may think differently. We really just exist in our own space playing the few shows we can commit to with bands we like or know. I definitely believe Brisbane/Australia has been proven capable of producing world-class bands though.
Dan (True Widow)
SPB: Are genre labels important to assign to music? 
Dan: I don't think genre labels are important. I do think they are helpful. When I get asked what kind of music we play I always say rock music. Not very helpful. Then I start saying things like 'it's heavy and slow. But not aggressive heavy. I sing and the bass player sings, she's a girl. Blah blah blah. '
Genre labels get you to the point more quickly. I'm no snob, so I don't mind all the things that people come up with to describe music. 
Chris Brokaw (solo, Wrekmeister Harmonies, The New Year, The Empty House Collective, ex-Codeine)
SPB: Rank these listening formats: cd, vinyl, cassette, digital, (other?)
Chris: 1) Vinyl. For so many reasons. But I guess the best is that I recently concluded that this is the best piece of art that exists. I consider music to be the most complex, thought-provoking, odd-emotion-inspiring, complete art form that exists - better than literature, film, photography, etc - and a vinyl album is its best form. And it's so cheap! For a few bucks up to 20 or 25 bucks you get this big, beautiful thing to pore over FOREVER. It can change your life in so many ways and it keeps doing that forever. It's the best investment you can make. It's also, currently, the most stable form of music storage that exists...so there's that.
2) Cassette. Yes, I've jumped the bandwagon. I love cassettes: they're cheap, I like how they look and feel, and most of the cassettes I buy (noise, avante garde, metal) actually put a lot of work and thought into the packaging. I also like how people like Wolf Eyes are recycling old library tapes for their what they sell - less plastic garbage in that huge cesspool in the sea. I think that's cool. They feel special to me, unique. And I love cassette box sets. What a treat! It's thrilling and I love it.
3) CD. I like cds! They're fine! Great in the car. Also, cdr's mean you can make instant releases. People don’t buy them in stores, but they sure do buy them at shows and they pay for my groceries. They're a lot easier to shlepp around on tour than freakin’ LPs, that's for sure. And they're cheap. Ten bucks! Come on, you piker, ten bucks!
4) Digital. Zero interest. I have dowloaded noise things that sold out instantly and I couldn't get otherwise, or old/cool/obscure things people have posted, but a) it feels dirty, and b) it doesn't feel like I own the music. It's like I’m listening to it at someone's house. But, God Bless Everyone who is buying downloads. You rule! Thank you!
Sound: I don't necessarily agree that you "hear everything the first time you hear a cd," or that certain LPs are like "lakes" that reveal their mysteries over time. I think that varies a LOT with different musics. Very dense music requires multiple and focused listening no matter what form it's in. And there are LPs that sound like shit, and c's that sound astonishing. I try to keep open. 

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Cheryl Prime's most recent blogposts

Show Review: Caïna @ The Unicorn

Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 3:25 p.m. by Cheryl Prime

Caïna, Hordes, Barshasketh The Unicorn London, UK September 6 2013 We've been talking a lot about the rebirth of Caïna of late and we'll soon have a review of the new ...

Show Review: Winterfylleth @ The Black Heart

Posted Jan. 29, 2013, 7:50 a.m. by Cheryl Prime

The tiny Black Heart in Camden holds court to an evening of droned out sludge, traditional heavy doom, and more English black metal than you can shake a stick at ...

Show Review: The Great Old Ones w/Terzij de Horde and Oblivionized @ The Unicorn, London (January 5th 2013)

Posted Jan. 9, 2013, 12:17 a.m. by Cheryl Prime

The Unicorn is suffering from a severe lack of air con tonight, the tension in the air made all the palpable by the insane levels of heat and the anticipation ...

Show Review: Neurosis and Godflesh @ Kentish Town Forum, London (December 2nd 2012)

Posted Dec. 8, 2012, 8:39 p.m. by Cheryl Prime

The view that Scene Point Blank has been afforded for tonight’s performance is beautiful, and the sea of heads below on the floor is all the more astonishing seen from ...

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Cheryl Prime's SPB contributions

100 reviews 13 features 76 news posts 5 blogposts
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