Staff Cheryl Prime

Cheryl Prime

Senior Staff Writer

London

Cheryl Prime's last content update – April 21, 2014, 6:31 a.m.

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Cheryl Prime's most recent reviews
Anathema - Universal album cover

Anathema

Universal, 2013

9.0 / 10
Video/DVD Review

Anathema's live performance had always been something special and their latter day music is built for an arena such as the roman theatre of Philippopolis and the accompaniment of the ...

Lvcifyre - Svn Eater album cover

Lvcifyre

Svn Eater, 2014

8.0 / 10

London’s Lvcifyre have been slowly, murkily climbing towards the top of the local death metal scene for a number of years now and while their inception occurred sometime in 2007, ...

Wild Beasts - Present Tense album cover

Wild Beasts

Present Tense, 2014

8.5 / 10

Wild Beasts are a curious entity and their singular approach to “indie” is one that has seem them take on more electronic feel as their career has progressed and with Present ...

Nebelung  - Palingenesis album cover

Nebelung

Palingenesis, 2014

8.5 / 10

Nebelung's gorgeous Palingenesis is born of melancholy and sadness and the themes of an approaching finality coupled with the knowledge of rebirth echoes throughout a work that is layered and coloured with ...

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Cheryl Prime's most recent features
Samothrace

One Question Interviews Samothrace

Posted March 30, 2014, 9:54 p.m.

Bryan Spinks (Samothrace, vocalist/guitarist) SPB: How did you get so bloody heavy? Spinks: I suppose it is a culmination of some different things. Obviously the riffs have to be ...

Mothlite

One Question Interviews Mothlite

Posted March 16, 2014, 11:10 a.m.

Daniel O’ Sullivan (Mothlite) SPB: How do you find the time for so many different projects? O'Sullivan: I don't find the time because time doesn't exist. It ...

Lunaire

One Question Interviews Lunaire

Posted Dec. 11, 2013, 8:14 a.m.

Lunaire SPB: Earlier this year you posted a picture of your drum kit in a basketball hall - is that the strangest place you've ever recorded, and if not, where ...

Caïna

Interviews Caïna

Posted Nov. 30, 2013, 5:12 p.m.

Let's go back to 2011, to when Andy Curtis-Brignell signed the death warrant for his solo, black metal of sorts project, Caïna. We spoke about it at length ...

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Cheryl Prime's most recent news stories
1QI: Billy West, Morning Glory, Vacation, 20 Buck Spin

Bands 1QI: Billy West, Morning Glory, Vacation, 20 Buck Spin

Our newest feature here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview every ...

Billy West (voice actor, Futurama, Ren & Stimpy, many more)
SPB: You've also played music in your past and you do some singing ("Shut Up and Love Me") in Futurama. How much creative say do you have when your characters create music?
Billy: Most of the music was always written for us and we sang exactly what Ken Keeler (writer,composer and producer) wanted.
I really didn't have much say in what my characters did except the acting choices. But on "Shut up and Love Me" they came up with the song title and I wrote the music and lyrics.
Beautifully puerile!
Ezra Arrow Kire (Morning Glory)
SPB: What do you think of Record Store Day?
Ezra: Record Store Day? It should be an official national holiday! Why? Because every child of the '80s and '90s remembers going down to their local record shop and listening to those big, shiny black, magic pieces of vinyl with those gigantic headphones on, going over and over that large format art for hours on end, reading every little detail in the liner notes, all the way down to the smallest credits.
Sometimes when browsing around my record shop I would run into other music enthusiasts and get to discussing and arguing over the value and content of "good" bands. Occasionally it could become quite heated and I'd leave slightly irritated (mainly because I knew they were right), but still elated to have discovered something brand spanking new! Not only is it the truly tangible experience of musical exploration that you just can't find online, it's often educational! A musical library stock full of hidden gems and rare treasures.  
And now-a-days I have another reason to go into a record shop--I get to see my own records in the "M" section (or maybe once in a while they'll turn up in the used "99 cent bargain" section, hehe). Hell, either way it's a great way to get my own music for cheap! Or sometimes I'll just autograph it and slip it back into place. And if they don't carry my record, well I just go pester the shop owner directly until he gets hip and agrees to stock it! And since it's good luck to go out and buy a copy of your album on its release day… there's only place you can do that--your local record store! I vote national holiday for this one. 
Evan (Vacation)
SPB: What is your primary tour food?
Our primary tour food is PIZZA. Like as much as your town has to offer, and if you know where we can get a New Jersey-style slice let us know! Bbeen achin' to try some. Also see this, except no riboflavin for us.
David Adelson (20 Buck Spin)
SPB: What is the worst job you’ve ever had? 
David: Worst job I ever had was one of my first. When I was 16 I was suspended from school for smoking weed on campus. Since I could not go to school for 3 days my Dad said I'd have to make use of the time by finding a job. I got two jobs at once, one at Round Table Pizza (probably the 2nd worst job I ever had) and one at a pet grooming place where I was hired to clean up after the people who did the pet grooming. That entailed sweeping up pet hair mostly. But I immediately knew I'd made a mistake as smelling animals in the place all day and cleaning up after people and pets was not what I was ready to do. I quit after 2 days. Actually I don't even think I quit. Being 16 and as such a completely irresponsible and unaccountable asshole (like almost every boy of that age), I believe I just stopped going in without letting them know. Given minimum wage in California was $4.25/hr at this point (1993), I don't think I left more than about $25 behind. 

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1QI: The Stooges, The Copyrights, Dovetail, Direct Hit!

Bands 1QI: The Stooges, The Copyrights, Dovetail, Direct Hit!

Posted April 13, 2014, 5:31 a.m.

Our newest feature here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview every ...

Mike Watt (bass, The Stooges, minutemen, solo, more)
SPB: How have the Stooges shows gone? Is it difficult to step into a group where the other members have an existing relationship and you’re the new guy?
Mike: I have served 125 months with The Stooges. Of course I owe them my best notes and total focus when helping them - we wouldn't have a punk scene without them! I feel incredible debt. It's helped me become much better bassman.
As for the second question, those cats hadn't talked much in over twenty years before that "skull-ring" stuff they did together but, yes, I am from a different generation but music is a fabric that can bridge gaps like that, I believe. Remember, too, I help them out and ain't really a Stooge. I'm a minuteman. I'm talking about d. boon's bass player.
The Stooges gigs are incredible mindblows for me, I love them. Incredible responsibility for me to be there for them also. I give them all I got and feel I very much have to. I love Stooges.
Luke McNeill (the Copyrights, attorney)
SPB: Did you choose your band name partially because of your interest in law?
Luke: No. It was actually a name we almost called me and Adam's old band, Moloko Plus. That name was a popular one for obvious reasons, and a dumb jazz band from Philadelphia sent us a cease and desist from using it, so we thought of Copyrights as an ironic name to change it to. We didn't pick that, but we picked that name soon after for our more "Ramones-based" punk band. It was almost required at the time to have a "The _____s" band name.
Dovetail
SPB: Who is your favorite 1960s band or artist?
Philip: The Beatles reign supreme in my ‘60s catalog. For records like Rubber Soul, The Beatles, and for obvious reasons. I feel they were the best band, though I'd probably say Gram Parsons is equally my favorite artist from the ‘60s.
Andrew: The Beatles. Their belief and conviction in their music was strong enough to change generations with their music. Outside of the music influence, I feel this is one of the biggest influences in Dovetail. Every member truly believes in what we are doing, which is to create honest music.
Aaron: My favorite record of all time came out in 1959. Kind of Blue by Miles Davis. This record taught me the power of creating and using space in music and showed me that even the casual listener could enjoy being challenged. Though not stylistically similar, I write my parts in Dovetail based on what this record taught me.
Nick Woods (Direct Hit!, Galactic Cannibal)
SPB: What is the best Milwaukee-made beer?
Nick: My favorite Milwaukee-made beer is Fuel Coffee Stout, more for the memory of getting hammered on it at a bar that I won't name on Center Street that used to let underagers play tunes in exchange for liquor. It's this super-bitter, almost chocolatey-tasting stuff that's about the same consistency as kerosene. My old band and I used to steal it out of that unnamed bar's cooler in the basement, and then act stupid for the rest of the night ‘cause we were only 18 or 19 and thought being able to drink in the bar by ourselves made us kings of Shit Mountain. I mainly drink it now ‘cause it tastes really good.

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1QI: Capitalist Kids, Flobots, Melt Banana and The Icarus Line

Bands 1QI: Capitalist Kids, Flobots, Melt Banana and The Icarus Line

Posted April 6, 2014, 9:43 a.m.

Our newest feature here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview every ...

Jeff (Capitalist Kids)
SPB: Who is your favorite capitalist hero?
Jeff: Ha ha. I don't have a capitalist hero. The Capitalist Kids are not huge fans of capitalism, even though every once in a while someone mistakenly “likes” our Facebook page with that belief. I suppose if we want to use this question as a springboard for discussing capitalism, I'll give you some of my thoughts. But, disclaimer: I am not an intellectual. 
Capitalism's very purpose seems to be to create extreme disparity--haves and have-nots, the 1% and 99%--whichever you like. You have CEOs making something like 273 times as much as the average employee of a firm, which is a preposterous notion to me. No person is worth 273 times as much as another person. The only reason I can figure that Americans have supported it for so long is that deep down everyone thinks that he/she has a shot at being one of the winners. Meanwhile, millions are working full-time and not making ends meet because jobs are outsourced by the capitalist masters and the minimum wage is not something you can live on. (1 in 6 Americans falls below the poverty line. Is all that bailout money going to trickle down or what?)
Speaking of bailouts, isn't that a joke? These casino capitalists go hog-wild and as soon as they get in too deep, the taxpayers are forced to rescue them. It's hard to even discuss capitalism really, because we don't even operate under it. We have nothing like a free market here. 
Another thing I don't like about capitalism is its obsession with growth. Growth is imperative. Every company has to make more profit than it made last quarter. In addition to laying people off whenever possible, this means maximum depletion of resources, maximum exploitation of the cheapest available workforce, and the constant manufacturing of wants and needs for consumers to consume. Not all growth is inherently good. (Sort of like how the GDP gets a boost from negative things like crime [legal fees, medical bills, replacements costs] and pollution.) We're facing a planetary ecological crisis, and capitalism is incompatible with solving it.
But it's a hard battle to fight, because in our society money equals power, and the people with the money have been shaping and coding all the rules to their benefit for some time. So they got more money, which equals more power, and so on. Oh yeah, and they have a militarized police force protecting their interests.
I apologize for the lengthiness of this response. I'll sum up by saying that for decades it's been taboo in this country to question whether or not capitalism is really the best and only economic system to operate under. But I think more and more people are starting to see past the bullshit.
Jonny 5 (Flobots)
SPB: When did you opt to make your living as a musician/did you quit a regular day job in doing so?
Jonny 5: Yes! I was working as a paraprofessional at East High School, a job I thoroughly enjoyed. I helped with the A+ Angels Mentoring program, Link Crew, and a Peer Tutoring program, and also was the sponsor for the PeaceJam club and the school's open mic club.
Yako (Melt Banana)
SPB: What surprised you the most on your first US tour?
Yako: I was surprised that we needed to show ID to enter the clubs. In Japan, we don't need to be over 21 to enter clubs!
Joe Cardamone (The Icarus Line)
SPB: is your drink of choice?
Joe: Fizzy water 

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1QI: Arcade Fire, APMD, Stranger By Starlight and Multiple Truths

Bands 1QI: Arcade Fire, APMD, Stranger By Starlight and Multiple Truths

Posted March 30, 2014, 1:29 p.m.

Our newest feature here at Scene Point Blank is our semi-daily quickie Q&A: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook or twitter and we'll post one interview every ...

Sarah Neufeld (solo, Arcade Fire)
SPB: What are the biggest challenge you face in getting the sound you want live while playing with amplified instruments?
Sarah: I've always had a pretty good pick-up situation on my violin, so it hasn't really been an issue. It is fun to experiment with pushing the sound of that instrument in a band context. I've found the moogerfooger delay pedal warms the sound a lot and gives it a nice gritty edge. Also, reverb is an amplified violin's best friend- its a good idea to play around with a ton of different reverb pedals until you find one that really speaks your verb language..
Kevin Baker (All Pigs Must Die )
SPB: What is your favorite thing about international touring?
Kevin: In my opinion, traveling to different regions and absorbing the culture is the greatest thing anyone can ever do in life. I really miss that part of being in a band and am real fortunate I got to do it when I did. I remember one time we were in Tokyo and members of another band we knew at the time didn't want to leave the hotel! I kept thinking, "How many times are you gonna be in Tokyo" or wherever it is you are touring at the time? How could you not want to walk out the front door to the hotel and at least go for a walk down the street? I can't understand that mindset. 
Anthony (Stranger by Starlight)
SPB: What is your favorite 1970s artist?
It's incredibly difficult to pick a favourite artist, album or even track from the entirety of the 1970s, so many things spring immediately to mind, all of which deserve to be mentioned: Leonard Cohen, The Stooges, Amon Duul II and Ash Ra Temple, Gang of Four, Joy Division...my head spins even trying to decide amongst them.There are two pieces which I most strongly want to choose, but neither were actually released in the ‘70s, despite both being written and premiered in that decade.
Arvo Part - Cantus in Memoriam of Benjamin BrittenHenryk Gorecki - Symphony No.3Both of these pieces of music make time stand still, but considering the fact that neither had wide exposure until a decade or so later...perhaps they don't count.So instead I've decided upon a track which was released at the very tail end of the ‘70s, and set a benchmark for the decade to follow. It's also the first vinyl I ever asked my father to play, at the age of around 5. To me it symbolises both my own musical awakening and my family's influence in my life.Bauhaus - Bela Lugosi's Dead. 
Eugene (Stranger By Starlight)
I can do one better...though this was the next to last decade when the album really ruled supreme and behind that the auteurs that created it, anticipating where music would go I am going to bypass my faves -- Eddie & the Hotrods, Lydia Lunch, Prince, the Plasmatics -- and instead not only focus on one act but one SONG and that song is a cover of Spencer Davis Group's "I'm a Man" by the Italian-French-American group MACHO. About 18 minutes of pure disco lunacy. Pre-AIDS, deep, deep disco. And total, total genius from many different perspectives.
Justin Wettstein (Multiple Truths)
SPB: After music, what other arts are you interested in?
Justin: Taking music out of the art spectrum is tough. I feel that music plays a large part in many forms of art, at least in some small capacity...so I must admit, I was a little stumped at first. When forced to think about it, though, I realized that my homosexuality has, over the years, led me to pursue various forms of queer art. I'm lucky to be surrounded by lots of amazingly talented homos who get out there and pursue their passions. Living in Chicago, there's no shortage of things to do so, on any given night, you could find me at a drag show, a photo show, or an art show that a friend of mine is either performing at or showing pieces in. A lot of people close to me have been productive with their art lately as well, in turn driving me to do more myself. Vinny Lopez is a NYC based writer/director responsible for the web-series Two Jasperjohns and the short film Scholarship. Martin Sorrondeguy published an amazing photo book last year called Get Shot : A Visual Diary 1985-2012. Ivan Lozano is a Chicago based visual artist/curator who's done many a rad show and was just featured in a Chicago Tribune profile of the city's top curators. Those are just a few. 
Music is still my personal go-to art form, but art is about community...and I feel very fortunate to be able to admire and gather inspiration from people I love and respect through the routes they pursue.

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Cheryl Prime's most recent blogposts

Show Review: Caïna @ The Unicorn

Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 3:25 p.m. by Cheryl Prime

Caïna, Hordes, Barshasketh The Unicorn London, UK September 6 2013 We've been talking a lot about the rebirth of Caïna of late and we'll soon have a review of the new ...

Show Review: Winterfylleth @ The Black Heart

Posted Jan. 29, 2013, 7:50 a.m. by Cheryl Prime

The tiny Black Heart in Camden holds court to an evening of droned out sludge, traditional heavy doom, and more English black metal than you can shake a stick at ...

Show Review: The Great Old Ones w/Terzij de Horde and Oblivionized @ The Unicorn, London (January 5th 2013)

Posted Jan. 9, 2013, 12:17 a.m. by Cheryl Prime

The Unicorn is suffering from a severe lack of air con tonight, the tension in the air made all the palpable by the insane levels of heat and the anticipation ...

Show Review: Neurosis and Godflesh @ Kentish Town Forum, London (December 2nd 2012)

Posted Dec. 8, 2012, 8:39 p.m. by Cheryl Prime

The view that Scene Point Blank has been afforded for tonight’s performance is beautiful, and the sea of heads below on the floor is all the more astonishing seen from ...

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Darkthrone Alcest Rome Agalloch Anathema VNV Nation Metallica AFI Burzum Panopticon 40 Watt Sun Emperor Inquisition Walknut Sargeist Kelly Clarkson

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Cheryl Prime's SPB contributions

92 reviews 13 features 55 news posts 5 blogposts
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