Staff Cheryl

Cheryl

Senior Staff Writer

London

Cheryl's last content update – Feb. 6, 2017, 9:45 p.m.

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Cheryl's most recent reviews
AFI - AFI (The Blood Album) album cover

AFI

AFI (The Blood Album), 2017

7.5 / 10
Multiple Authors

AFI's trajectory over the last twenty and more years has been one that emulates growth and experimentation and the quartet that once sang about not being allowed a mohawk is ...

Darkthrone - Arctic Thunder album cover

Darkthrone

Arctic Thunder, 2016

8.0 / 10

Darkthrone may have been around for nigh on thirty years, but it hasn’t stopped the Norwegian duo from consistently releasing music and constantly changing up their sound to keep them ...

40 Watt Sun - Wider than the Sky album cover

40 Watt Sun

Wider than the Sky, 2016

9.0 / 10

40 Watt Sun hold a special place in the hearts of those who have heard their music and been affected by the honesty within. 2011s The Inside Room was a ...

Alcest - Kodama album cover

Alcest

Kodama, 2016

9.0 / 10

Kodama (loosely translating to “tree spirit” in Japanese) is a record that follows Alcest’s path of spirituality in music, and while Shelter (2014) was a lovely, warm, summery album, in ...

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Cheryl's most recent features
Alcest

Interviews Alcest

Posted Feb. 1, 2017, 2:32 p.m.

Alcest’s latest record, Kodama, is an album that wears its heart on its sleeve. It’s rich, textured and warm and is influenced by frontman Neige’s (Stéphane ...

City States

One Question Interviews City States

Posted Sept. 30, 2015, 12:16 a.m.

Joel (City States) SPB: How do you find the time to work on so many projects and do your regular day job (if you have one)?  Joel: At the risk ...

Northumbria

One Question Interviews Northumbria

Posted April 6, 2015, 3:06 a.m.

Dorian Williamson (Northumbria) SPB: You recorded your first album in a church - what was it about the space that appealed to you and what kind of spaces would you like ...

Rome

One Question Interviews Rome

Posted April 6, 2015, 3:03 a.m.

Jerome Reuter (Rome) SPB: You're playing some anniversary shows this year and visiting some interesting places - How did you decide which countries to play in?  Reuter: I have to ...

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Cheryl's most recent news stories
1QI: Entropy, Soft Kill, Body Stuff

Bands 1QI: Entropy, Soft Kill, Body Stuff

Posted Jan. 30, 2017, 3:46 p.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview three days each week, typically every Tuesday-Thursday ...

Brian (Entropy)
SPB: What do you think the internet has done for the word of mouth punk scene? 
Brian: As far as how it effects underground punk rock, the internet is both a blessing and a curse.
It's obviously made it way easier to spread news, learn about shows and, most importantly, discover new music. But it's that easy for everyone to get the word out, so there ends up being an overload of information. Suddenly people just dipping their toes in are being invited to every show from Boston to California and every band on earth is vying for their attention which predictably gets to be a bit much.
When I started going to shows in the ‘90s, I would be stoked to get a flyer and know when and where the next show was. I'd wonder about the band I'd never heard of with “from Boston” under their name and would be excited to see them. Now when promoting shows, the dynamic has shifted so that you're basically bothering people who may or may not even be interested. I mean, half the people logging in to look at porn for three minutes to get a proper wank in before getting on with their day just aren't that interested that Puking Chloroform are playing at the Ritz next Thursday night.
The ease of internet promotion can cause a lazy complacency that belies the urgency in message that should always be present in punk rock, and that part of it just plain sucks. The ability to quickly reach people the world over is an amazing force that's easy to underestimate, however, so it's a mixed bag.
Tobias Sinclair (Soft Kill)
SPB: How did you meet the new members and how did they get on the Soft Kill ship?
Tobias: Owen & Conrad have been with the band since the Heresy LP.  I met Owen when I was nineteen and playing in grind core / noise bands.  We spent our initial time together playing with broken synthesizers in his basement and in a lot of ways he taught me how to create some of the sounds I had in my head at that time. This lead to me starting my first project of my own which was how I came into contact with Conrad who was making similarly fucked up noise.  Eric started playing guitar with us in 2012 and is on the Seven Hundred 7" but never played with us until recently.  I met him when I sprayed his other band down with a fire extinguisher when they played my warehouse six years ago.  It looks like my old band and room mate Drew will be playing drums for us starting in 2017 as well.  I met him when he was sixteen and have watched him grow into a total savage... one of the most brilliant players and skaters I've encountered.  
anopendoor.bandcamp.com
Curran Reynolds (Body Stuff)
SPB: Do you make a conscious decision to reference or deviate from past material when working on Body Stuff?
Curran: The Body Stuff approach is to make music from the gut, without consciously thinking about any other music at all. After it's made, then I can reflect and say, "Hey, this sounds like it's referencing this or that." Looking at the two EPs I've made so far, in hindsight I can say that some of what's being referenced is the big rock and pop hits of the late '80s. This is the music I grew up with as a little kid and naturally it comes through. But those influences are buried under the noise of other influences, like death metal drumming and various New York City vibes. And to compare the first EP and the second, I think the second has some dreamy Maine woods isolation vibes in it too, because that's where I was living the year I wrote it.

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1QI: Flagpolers, Adam Gnade & the Hot Earth, Ion Dissonance

Bands 1QI: Flagpolers, Adam Gnade & the Hot Earth, Ion Dissonance

Posted Jan. 26, 2017, 3:51 p.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview three days each week, typically every Tuesday-Thursday ...

Flagpolers
SPB: What is a flagpoler?
Flagpolers: A Flagpoler is a nickname/kind of slur to that border guards give to people renewing their immigration status in Canada. At the point of starting this band 3/4 of us we're flagpolers and from Ireland. Now half the band is still Flagpolers and from Ireland. I hope that helps!
Adam Gnade & the Hot Earth
SPB: Do you approach writing lyrics differently than you approach fiction?
Gnade: With fiction I have this big well of a story I draw from. A lot of it is planned out already--how my characters interact, where their lives go, their deaths, births, marriages, their struggles, their ambitions and their failures. I've got it all there in my head (and partially on paper) and when it's time to write a book I just pick up a section of it and tell that part of the story. It's planned out, yeah, but the story itself is always expanding--new characters come in, other fade away or are set aside for later. I write one book at a time but I have about eight outlined and ready to be filled in.
The "talking songs" are taken from the same universe but with them I just pick up one small idea and expand upon it--a single scene in a character's life or maybe a question I'm worrying myself over. Hopefully when put together one day they'll comprise a large and substantial body of work. I want it to be something vast and alive and hungry and immersive. Something like Proust meets Springsteen--one long connected saga of American life that will be a history of the time we lived and who we were and what we did here.
Kevin McCaughey (Ion Dissonance – vocals)
SPB: What song would you want played at your funeral? Kevin: The only song that comes to mind when asked this question is ''Highway to Hell'' from AC/DC. Simply put, I can only imagine how totally awkward it would be to have relatives and friends mourning my passage and hearing ''Highway to Hell'' blaring on the stereo. The situation itself screams my name. It's totally like me to try and lighten the mood with an inappropriate well placed joke.  

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1QI: Die Young, Colombian Necktie, Black Table

Bands 1QI: Die Young, Colombian Necktie, Black Table

Posted Dec. 30, 2016, 6:25 a.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview three days each week, typically every Tuesday-Thursday ...

Daniel Albaugh (Die Young)
SPB: What is the longest (in terms of time) tour you’ve been on? Would you be out for that long again?
Daniel: In Die Young's touring hey-day, mainly 2004-2008, we did quite a few tours that were roughly two months long. Sometimes the tours that included international dates in Asia or Europe felt the longest simply because crossing an ocean and being in a totally different place for weeks at a time gave us the illusion (see what I did there) that we had been out longer than we had. Like the tour in 2006 where we played shows out to California, hopped a plane to Japan and then toured East Asia for three weeks, flew back to California, then played up to Seattle, flew to Alaska for a few shows, then flew back down to Seattle and crossed into Canada to play about a week's worth of shows there, and then toured all the way back down the midwest to Texas. That was about 7 and a half weeks in all, but when I got home it had felt like a lifetime within a lifetime. We did several tours like that, particularly in Europe, where the crossing of borders and oceans and time zones all the time really fucked up our sense of time. 
I remember Dan Yemen looking in our van outside of a show we played with Paint It Black at Gilman St. in Berkeley, CA. We were sleeping mainly on our merch bins. He was impressed, and he said, "Wow, you guys tour like real men." That still makes me chuckle and feel a little proud.But fuck no, as glorious as all that was at that time in my life, I would never do tours that are that long ever again. All my gym gains would go out the window. I love sleeping in the same bed as my lady, and I'd worry about my dogs and cats too much. Touring is miserable, honestly, especially after you have done it for years and years. Like falling in love, it's easy and fun at first, even when it is challenging, but after time it becomes a real chore. At this point we prefer to keep things short and sweet so we can still enjoy playing shows. I really do enjoy playing shows much more now than when we were playing 200+ a year.
Juan Hernandez (Colombian Necktie – guitar)
SPB: What band has been your favorite to tour with? 
Juan: We actually don't have a favorite but we definitely have a most memorable. Last year we went out on tour with friends Black Sheep Wall and we were playing in SLC. We went to this wing spot that had a spicy wing eating contest. Basically you had 12 wings that were insanely spicy and you had to eat them in 30 minutes. The singer Brandon decided he wanted to try it so we cheered him on. Three wings deep he calls it and goes pale. After he runs to the restroom the rest became interested and tried them. It was the wrong decision. It ended up being a super hilarious bonding experience but painful spicy memory.
Ryan Fleming (Black Table)
SPB: What is the most tiresome stereotype about black metal?
Ryan: We don't consider ourselves Black Metal, but I'll speak about how I view scenes in general. It's similar to Animal Farm. It begins as an exciting rebellion against the confinement and closed thinking of a situation, but it eventually becomes the same thing. A new set of rules, standards and control. Genres are created to make sense of and compartmentalize new thinking. When those rules and standards create a barrier to creativity, expression or growth they need to be torn down.

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1QI: Something Is Waiting, Somni, Knife Hits

Bands 1QI: Something Is Waiting, Somni, Knife Hits

Posted Dec. 4, 2016, 3:29 a.m.

Welcome to our almost daily quickie Q&A feature: One Question Interviews. Follow us at facebook & twitter and we'll post an interview three days each week, typically every Tuesday-Thursday ...

Eddie Gobbo (Something Is Waiting)
SPB: What is your favorite album cover of all time?
Eddie: Bruce Springsteen - Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ
Luke (Somni)
SPB: What is the best movie you’ve seen this year?
Luke: I've seen a lot of great films this year, so this is tricky. I'm going to go with The Witch (dir: Robert Eggers), a great little horror film set in yee olde times featuring a goat called Black Philip. It was brilliant! I'm a big horror fan, and this was what I'd call a proper horror film, but others might not. By that I mean that it doesn't rely on jump scares or gore, instead building up tension through the atmosphere and the relationships between the characters. For me it was about loss, isolation, family, hysteria, madness and evil goats -  a perfect date-night movie! I'd love to see more horror films like this (or films in general), so grounded in realism you can taste the dirt under the characters' fingernails, so if there's any magic, witchery or general strange goings-on you're much more likely to go with it. Check it out!
https://twitter.com/somn_i
Jake Smith (Knife Hits)
SPB: Who is your favorite flyer/gigposter artist?
Jake: I narrowed my answer to a tie between two amazing artists and they happen to be two of my best friends. From my earliest days of playing shows in Florida (about 15 years ago), Vivek Vasudeva made the coolest flyers for our bands, I remember one that looked like the National Enquirer with pictures of "bat boy" and each headline was a piece of information about the show. He STILL makes amazing posters/flyers for shows in his now hometown of Portland, OR. My other favorite is Ryan Fromdeland, sometimes he throws together flyers in Photoshop that look like newspaper clippings from science fiction movies in the ‘60s, or sometimes he'll draw something by hand with a unique style, extreme detail, and always punk as fuck. Over the years, these two artists really seem to have influenced each other. It's amazing to watch friends influence one another with their art whether it be music or pen on paper, or anything else.

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Cheryl's most recent blogposts

Katatonia @ Shepherd's Bush Empire

Posted Oct. 28, 2016, 5:48 a.m. by Cheryl

Katatonia @ Shepherd's Bush Empire w/ VOLA, Agent Fresco Emotion is the name of the game tonight, with Sweden’s Katatonia bringing their resonant doom to the London masses not once, but ...

Paradise Lost @ KOKO

Posted Oct. 11, 2015, 5:26 a.m. by Cheryl

Paradise Lost w/Tribulation and Lucifer October 4th @ KOKO, London Hype surrounding a band is either indicative of said band being incredibly talented and worth your time, or, on the ...

Caïna @ The Unicorn

Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 3:25 p.m. by Cheryl

Caïna, Hordes, Barshasketh The Unicorn London, UK September 6 2013 We've been talking a lot about the rebirth of Caïna of late and we'll soon have a review of the new ...

Winterfylleth @ The Black Heart

Posted Jan. 29, 2013, 7:50 a.m. by Cheryl

The tiny Black Heart in Camden holds court to an evening of droned out sludge, traditional heavy doom, and more English black metal than you can shake a stick at ...

Cheryl's bio

"Without music, life would be a mistake."
Writer. SPB Social Media Contributor. 

I also like coffee and film and cats. 

Cheryl's personal URL

http://twitter.com/Cheryl_Prime

Cheryl's SPB contributions

116 reviews 24 features 144 news posts 7 blogposts
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