Blog Adventures in Quantumland book review

Adventures in Quantumland book review

Posted Aug. 31, 2019, 11 a.m. by T

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Adventures in Quantumland: Exploring Our Unseen Reality

World Scientific Publishing

 

I have been following philosopher and physicist Ruth Kastner explorations on what constitutes and lies underneath of what we refer to reality for quite a while.

This tome of hers is divides into two components: While the first half follows a stringent thread, the second one is collection of essays and treatises authored by herself and other contributors, each zeroing in and elaborating on a distinct issue previously covered in the first half.

What makes Kastner’s book an enticing read is that it is accessible without the need to having completed a master’s degree on the sujet: The language is not plagued with technical terms and the way Kastner makes her cases are relatable, clear, succinct and brief without the subject matter being “dumbed down”.

Now, quantum theory has always intrigued me and the way Kastner moves us through the subject is captivating and if I was pressed to simmer it down to its essence, I’d say that it focuses on the fact that a transfer of measurable energy, i.e. a “quantum” requires an interaction between an emitter and absorber with the interactions being present, incipient and actual, with every incipient potential occurring instantly and simultaneously throughout the universe.

In a nutshell, Dr. Kastner theory means that no real photon can leave an emitter until a real absorber is selected out of the incipient possibilities. If you follow her train of thought, it is an interesting yet debatable conclusion.

I found Kastner’s musing on quantum mechanics and mind or more specifically the possibility of free will interesting, i.e. quantum mechanics not only freeing us from determinism but is being volitional, as well as the analogies she draws between her take a quantum mechanics and ancient Greek and Hind metaphysical phenomena. Now these might be pure speculation, but it adds another layer to her theory.

Summa summarum, I’d recommend this book to anyone remotely interested in quantum related theories, as it explains the notion of transaction theory from different angles and offers food for both the initiated as well as the ones with in-depth knowledge.

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