Reviews Tex Perkins Tex

Tex Perkins

Tex

Pizzazz. 
Omph. 
Attitude.
Sensibility.
A sardonic sense of humour.
Charisma.
Swagger.


If your music depends entirely on that, the dependency is too great.


Tex Perkins has been in the game for close to four decades. 


He oozes the aforementioned qualities yet his oeuvre stands for itself.


More than three decades of versatility and effortlessly moving between a range of genres and incarnations, while still retaining his own DNA.


Tex Perkins has fronted some of the most spirited best bands Australia has to offer, e.g. The Cruel Sea, The Beasts Of Bourbon, Tex, Don & Charlie, Dark Horses, Thug, The Ladyboyz and many other projects, including performing as Johnny Cash in the acclaimed Man In Black theatre show. 

His memoir Tex lays bare an extraordinary life lived on the road, on the stage and on the edge. Raised a bible-thumping Catholic and beaten bloody on the streets of Brisbane for being a "cow-punk", skinny Gregory Perkins flees to Sydney and mutates into "Tex", rogue leader of the Dums Dums, Thug and Salamander Jim before finding a strange kind of success, celebrity, sex symboldom and icon status as Tex Perkins, snake-hipped, honey-voiced, often bloodied frontman of influential Aussie bands the Cruel Sea, Beasts of Bourbon and Tex, Don & Charlie... and inventor of "Zoneball."


Gigs. Albums. Tours. Fights. Feuds. Arrests. Drugs. High times. Low roads. A rollercoaster of a life written loudly, proudly and driven by Tex’s idiosyncratic energy.

So much for the basics.

See, you could claim that Tex Perkins and his incarnations have had a more than profound impact on my ever since I planted a foot on terra australis. 


Tex’ memoir is an extension of his musical explorations -- putting things into perspective, setting the record straight and delivering it with grace, humour and artful honesty.

He puts the reader in his shoes and with his self-deprecating approach has the ability to turn ordinary circumstances into funny scenes or ones that touch something deeper.

On the surface Tex’ memoir is comprised of thematic stories, but the sum of its parts amounts to something bigger than the whole –it touches a deeper truth as Perkins is good at being human, at once and incomplete. 


By that he is sharing a deeper truth.

A great, entertaining read no matter how familiar you are with Tex, his bands or the Australian music scene at large.

9.0 / 10T
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9.0 / 10

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