Review
Ground Unicorn Horn
Ground Unicorn Horn

Three One G (2007) Sean L.

Ground Unicorn Horn – Ground Unicorn Horn cover artwork
Ground Unicorn Horn – Ground Unicorn Horn — Three One G, 2007

Ground Unicorn Horn's self-titled release, which is packaged on a 3" mini-CD, is four minutes long, so I'm going to spend four minutes reviewing it.

Three One G Records is a silly lot of folks with some pretty forward thinking ideas. I have plenty of seven inches that are only four minutes long, and I'm fine with that. But when I am confronted with a CD, mini or otherwise, I expect something slightly more substantial. The fact that the packaging is very minimal and contains nothing but some illegible lyrics makes this even harder to swallow.

But the point here, I think, is about that sort of uncomfortable expectation. Obviously, Three One G isn't going to go broke if you don't buy it. They probably don't care, either. And that's neat. While so many bands are obsessed with self-promotion and appealing to a market, Justin Pearson and crew don't need to appeal to anyone. They're a well-established label that does whatever they want because they have the money to do it.

P.S. This sounds like every other Mark McCoy band since Charles Bronson. I dig it and you'll know if you like it or not because it's on Three One G.

6.0 / 10Sean L. • March 29, 2007

Ground Unicorn Horn – Ground Unicorn Horn cover artwork
Ground Unicorn Horn – Ground Unicorn Horn — Three One G, 2007

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