Review
Jenny Piccolo
Jenny Piccolo

Three One G (2006) Sean L.

Jenny Piccolo – Jenny Piccolo cover artwork
Jenny Piccolo – Jenny Piccolo — Three One G, 2006

Discography CD's are certainly a weird bunch. Bands nowadays don't generally record three or four records like many bands of yore, instead putting out a slew of seven-inches and compilation tracks (making this format viable and feasible). Or maybe bands of yore put out seven-inches and bands nowadays put out a demo, get signed, put out an EP, a full-length and then break up. Jenny Piccolo, though, falls in the seven-inch category and it's nice to finally be able to have all of the tracks in one convenient place. Is it totally necessary? Not at all, since all but the most die-hard/weird Three One G fans will really sit through the entire thing more than once. While it's only a little over thirty-six minutes, it's a little bit more than most can stomach.

For those unfamiliar with Jenny Piccolo - think The Locust, subtract the novelty, make it more punk, and add some Infest. While I can't say with much certainty that they were the pioneers of the weird San Diego grind scene, they are certainly a large part of it with members going on to…well a bunch of other Three One G type of acts. These dudes' pedigree and affiliations are all too incestuous and aside from the guy from Unbroken playing in Struggle with the dude from the Locust, I'm mostly lost since I misplaced the promo sheet it came with.

But what makes this worth shelling out your dough? Information Battle to Denounce the Genocide is personally one of my favorite post-Gravity San Diego releases. It has all of the reckless abandon and high-bass production of every good LP from the late 90's, and its influence is pretty undeniable. Also, there's a track on here with Justin Pearson doing vocals, which is pretty cool. So maybe this won't be in anyone's top 10 of the year lists for "Needed Discographies," but it's still a bunch of solid material that stands up next to all of the members' new bands and people who derived much of their noise from their scene.

7.4 / 10Sean L. • August 21, 2006

Jenny Piccolo – Jenny Piccolo cover artwork
Jenny Piccolo – Jenny Piccolo — Three One G, 2006

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