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Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.
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From the archive...
Frank Rosaly

One Question Interviews

Frank Rosaly

Posted Sept. 8, 2014, 12:42 a.m.

Frank Rosaly SPB: What's the worst (or strangest) stereotype you encounter from people when they find out you're a musician? Rosaly: “It must be so fantastic to be following your dream!” This response is probably the strangest of them all. I mean, it really bums me out. I understand that some people don’t have a calling to a particular career as a young person. Most people have a dream job they never pursue. Most people have a choice. Fear of discomfort keeps people from their calling.  *stepping on my pedestal. clear throat.* In the United States, there ...

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Radio K 2

One Question Interviews

Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.

Becca Richardson

One Question Interviews

Becca Richardson

Posted Feb. 13, 2018, 10:47 a.m.

Becca Richardson

SPB: What is the most touching or memorable thing a fan has told you about your work?

Becca: A fan sent me a video of her daughter singing along to one of my songs in the car and it was pretty adorable.

Black Swift

One Question Interviews

Black Swift

Posted Feb. 13, 2018, 10:45 a.m.

Sally Grayson (Black Swift)

SPB: What did participating in The Voice bring you, both personally and artistically?

When the talent scout approached me asking if I would audition for The Voice of Germany, I was very skeptical. I honestly really didn't think that this was something for me. I'm more of a punk rocker and not a pop singer. But, I decided to give it a go and try it out nonetheless, and I have to say, I'm very thankful I made that decision. 

The crew at The Voice of Germany are fabulous people and I was treated very respectfully as an artist. They want their "talents" to be and stay authentic and that was very important to me. As it was my first television performance I grew and learned about performing in all different environments. As I progressed in the show, the stages got bigger, as did the crowds. Minus the moment in between, when I sang a song privately to Michi and Smudo from Die Fantastischen Vier and Robbie Williams. I gained some great fans through being on that show, and I think probably subconsciously have set my goals higher after mingling with the stars and getting a taste of those bright lights. Artistically, I remain who I was before--meaning authenticity remains intact, but personally, it was a great gain for me and for Black Swift! 

Twitter:  @blackswiftmusic

www.blackswiftmusic.com

Broken Bellows

One Question Interviews

Broken Bellows

Posted Feb. 13, 2018, 10:43 a.m.

Will Prinzi (Broken Bellows)

SPB: What drummer (not your own band) stands out to you the most?

Will: Thomas Haake (Meshuggah) is the greatest drummer of all time. That is all.

The Travoltas

One Question Interviews

The Travoltas

Posted Feb. 3, 2018, 4:48 a.m.

Perry (The Travoltas)

SPB: Should more punk bands listen to Beach Boys and use their influences? And which album would you recommend to start listening?

Perry: That's an absolute yes. If you want to be schooled in songwriting and come up with great harmonies, this is it. Especially with the early records it's just back-to-the-basics: bare-bones production with great hooks and melodies. And don't limit yourself to just the Beach Boys, but pretty much the whole 60's pop scene. There's a reason why these songs are still around. 

I'd start with the early Beach Boys records like Surfin' Safari and Surfin' USA. Then work your way up to Pet Sounds and Smile, that's where things get more adventurous. If you go through the albums like that, you really start to get a good picture of what's going on in Brian Wilson's head, and how he's maturing as a person and as a songwriter.  

Fallow Land

One Question Interviews

Fallow Land

Posted Feb. 3, 2018, 4:45 a.m.

Whit (Fallow Land)

SPB: How do you choose your album art?

Whit: Fallow Land chose the album cover of Pinscher to mirror the overall attitude I had when writing it. My friend Andrea Calvetti is a fantastic photographer and videographer. I saw a photograph of his dog he had taken and posted on Facebook and I knew it had to be the cover of our EP. One of dog’s characteristics that I find interesting is that even though they have been domesticated and live in our houses, there is a wild animal living inside all of them. I think the photograph exemplifies this balance. Pinscher was written in an attempt to quell the chaos I felt inside of me. I felt this image was a fitting portrayal of that struggle. 

The images in the liner notes were created by Caitlin Boyce. Caitlin has been an essential member of our team. She does almost all of the visual art for the band including show posters, merch design, and some album art. Caitlin is an insanely talented artist and a good friend. Caitlin is responsive to what Fallow Land is trying to do auditorily and has found ways to recreate that aesthetic visually. Her artwork for the EP references our music video for “Faux.” Her images portray how others can influence one’s identity and self-image. In addition to creating the visual art for Fallow Land you can frequently find Caitlin manning the merch booth at our shows. She is a fantastic artist and an awesome person! 

Shilpa Ray

One Question Interviews

Shilpa Ray

Posted Feb. 3, 2018, 4:44 a.m.

Shilpa Ray

SPB: What is the strangest trend you see in modern music (or in the industry)?

Shilpa: Baseball caps. Too many baseball caps.

Fonija

One Question Interviews

Fonija

Posted Jan. 23, 2018, 11:05 a.m.

Deni Krstev (Fonija)

SPB: Fonija is changing their sound on every record so far. There is a certain risk attached to that: alienating your fanbase. How is this turning out for Fonija, do you have a strong fanbase that sticks around? And are you inspired by certain bands that kept changing and developing?

Deni: Heraclitus wrote that you cannot enter the same river twice. Why should we keep recording the same record over and over again if we think, listen to and feel differently? We want to be a band that stands the test of time and we want to leave an interesting story behind us. The only way to leave some legacy, to keep the audience and ourselves amused is to do something different each and every time. Of course, there is a tradition of doing radical changes from the musical point of view (but keeping the same philosophy all along) found in a lot of Macedonian bands like Leb i Sol, Mizar and Bernays Propaganda, we're just (deliberately or not) continuing that tradition. Of course the constant change of sound caries a risk of alienating our audience, but I'm more scared of doing the same old trick on every record. It's just pointless and I think by doing so, we would be underestimating our audience's musical intelligence. I strongly believe that we're growing along with our audience. 

 

MINKA

One Question Interviews

MINKA

Posted Jan. 23, 2018, 11:04 a.m.

Dick Rubin (MINKA)

SPB: What is the worst stereotype of musicians that you encounter when people discover you’re in a band?

Dick: When people discover you’re in a band, they always think to themselves: “I bet he wouldn’t be a good accountant.” well, I’m here to tell you…that’s a bunch of hogwash.

I know all about credits and debits. I’m an expert at diversifying your portfolio. I can even do long division.

So, the next time your aunt tells you she doesn’t trust a drummer to be her trusted financial advisor, please set her straight. because drummers can count, man.

Spider

One Question Interviews

Spider

Posted Jan. 23, 2018, 11:02 a.m.

Hector Martinez (Spider-lead vocals)

SPB: What is the best TV theme song? 

Hector: Without a doubt, I gotta say the theme song for the HBO show John From Cincinnati is the best theme song ever.

The song used is “Johnny Appleseed” performed by the inimitable Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros.

I always loved The Clash as a kid. London Calling was in constant rotation in my room, every song a gem on that album. As an adult I was fortunate beyond belief to work with Joe as his Tour Publicist. At the time the album Global a Go-Go came out I was the in-house tour publicist for Hellcat Records. It was a very special time in my life, as I had just started working for the label that was putting out records by the legendary Joe Strummer. It was surreal stuff and meant a lot to me. Now I’m the Director of Licensing at Hellcat Records, licensing recordings for use in films, video games, tv shows, etc... This was one of the first licenses I got to work on as I shifted from tour publicist to head of the licensing department.

The song itself is very cinematic, with its steady beat and with lines reflecting Joe’s love of classic cars “Lord, there goes a Buick ‘49” to burning philosophical questions of the human condition we all struggle with “We think there is a soul/ we don't know, That soul is hard to find” to cries for environmental wisdom “If you're after getting the honey/ Then you don't go killing all the bees.” This song truly has it all.

As the opening credits roll with visuals of California surf culture and the song chugging along in the background, it always brings me to a place of introspection that I love to visit. Then Joe ends it with that hearty cowboy style yell “Hey Ya!”, it always brings a smile to my face.

Check it out.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL02dHpkPjg

 

Wieuca

One Question Interviews

Wieuca

Posted Jan. 16, 2018, 10:04 a.m.

Will Ingram (Wieuca)

SPB: Who is the most overrated musician/band of all time? 

Will: Deerhunter aka Coldplay for hipsters

 

Edgewise

One Question Interviews

Edgewise

Posted Jan. 16, 2018, 10 a.m.

Kevin (Edgewise – drums)

SPB: How old were you when you first learned a music instrument?

Kevin: I was eleven when I officially started playing drums. In my mind, I had started years earlier. My oldest brother had a drumkit that he refused to let me play. I snuck a few hits in when I could, but it wasn't enough to satisfy my desire to crush the kit. Revenge can be a hell of a motivator. When I got the chance, I started playing drums, determined to make a mockery out of my brother's drumming abilities. I suppose I should be grateful to him for inspiring me.

Sarin

One Question Interviews

Sarin

Posted Jan. 16, 2018, 9:58 a.m.

David Wilson (Sarin - guitar/vocals)

SPB: How likely are you to pick up a record based off its cover with no knowledge of the band or music?

David: I generally treat cover art as indicative of what's inside, as presumably that's the imagery the band wants me to associate with their music. It's not unusual for me to buy an LP based on artwork alone, though price will dictate how much of a chance I'm willing to take on it. In a digital era especially, a good thumbnail will be your first (and often only) incentive to click "play." I'm one of those weirdos who likes to stare at the cover/spool through the art while listening to an album as well.

So to answer your question: Likely. Most of the time.

Steppe People

One Question Interviews

Steppe People

Posted Dec. 23, 2017, 4:43 a.m.

Eric Carlson (Steppe People)

SPB: What is your primary or go-to tour food?

Carlson: Touring allows bands the opportunity to venture out into the world, see new and exotic scenes, meet fans and future friends, and of course taste far out and local delicacies. None of those bands are Steppe People. Steppe People are a delicate ecosystem. In order to keep it tight, we require a strict regimen. When traveling, whether far or wide, we plan accordingly. During tour preparation, we look at a number of factors that influence our meal options. Among those factors, most significant are: rising oil prices, summer storms, travel patterns of migrant labor, and of course, Q3 fast casual marketing trends. Surprisingly, survey always says the Zagat rated Masala Zone.

Felix Hagan

One Question Interviews

Felix Hagan

Posted Dec. 23, 2017, 4:42 a.m.

SPB: What song (by any artist) has the best use of bongos?

Felix: That would be “Funky Nassau,” the version by The Blues Brothers. Never has bongoing been so succinctly demonstrated as a musical force. It’s in the second Blues Brothers film that I saw when I was ten, and it made me want to never sleep until I could play songs as well as they could. Plus it made me drench my first hundred songs in a whole school orchestra’s worth of percussion. Bongos forever. On a bongo-based sidenote, check out the 1959 film Expresso Bongo. It features a young Cliff Richard playing a character called “Bongo Herbert,” and is also a timeless parable of the music industry.  

Also, you may be interested to know that our new single just came out. If you fancied featuring it in any way that would be absolutely wonderful:

https://youtu.be/Wpqac74aoDM

Matthew Shipp

One Question Interviews

Matthew Shipp

Posted Dec. 23, 2017, 4:41 a.m.

SPB: You and Bobby Kapp come from two different eras of the NY free jazz scene. What did you discover in your recording sessions, about either the past and the present of the scene? 

Shipp: The great thing about music is that, even though we are all a specific product of the time and environment we come out of, occasionally there can be some type of slight transcendence of them. Kapp was around in the early wave of the jazz avant garde, in fact was on some early esp records—I have come along in a third or fourth generation of the music. [even though I do not consider myself avant grade]—

First, I think it helped that Kapp was off the scene for years [he has been living in Mexico]—also I think it helped that he has been involved with straight ahead jazz projects and afro cuban projects these last years. That is important because that tends to make what we do less self-conscious avant garde and we tend to just honestly search our musical vocabularies for what works musically. The whole breath and concept of phrasing  that exists in the music today is a different thing then when they where first discovering what they thought  felt like freedom in the ‘60s—[I have no idea what freedom is myself]. I think in our case we were both open enough to see what the other had to offer[ no matter what era we came from]—and we both have the flexibility in our approach to make something out of what emerged.

Kapp is also really hungry to make music and to have some fun. The degree to which he is hungry to do this really helps and there was no attitude like I played with Marion Brown and Gato Barbieri or anything like that coming from him. He was really open to the experience and to dealing with whatever it was I had to offer. All these little things add up and make a difference in the end, to make what we do a gestalt in and of its own that is more than some avant garde cat from the early ‘70s and some avant garde cat from the 21 Century just getting together. The degree to which this did work might not be possible with some other figures from the early wave of the music—this might be an anomaly.

Gino and the Goons

One Question Interviews

Gino and the Goons

Posted Dec. 5, 2017, 1:15 p.m.

Gino Bambino (Gino and the Goons)

SPB: Who is your favorite lyricist?

Gino:

I walk 47 miles of barbed wire,

I use a cobra-snake for a necktie,

I got a brand new house on the roadside,

Made from rattlesnake hide,

I got a brand new chimney made on top,

Made out of a human skull,

Now come on take a walk with me, Arlene,

And tell me, who do you love? 

Who do you love? 

Tombstone hand and a graveyard mind,

Just 22 and I don't mind dying.

Who do you love?

I rode around the town, use a rattlesnake whip,

Take it easy Arlene, don't give me no lip,

Who do you love?

Night was dark, when the sky was blue,

Down the alley, the ice-wagon flew,

Hit a bump, and somebody screamed,

You shoulda heard just what I seen.

Who do you love? 

Arlene took me by my hand,

And she said ooh wee Bo, you know I understand.

Who do you love?

 

Songwriter: ELLAS MCDANIEL

Plus Hank Sr., Chuck Berry, Jagger/Richards, Lemmy, Dee Dee, Pat Todd, Eric Davidson, Tbone Jones… 

Cindy Marabito (The Dicks From Texas)

One Question Interviews

Cindy Marabito (The Dicks From Texas)

Posted Dec. 5, 2017, 1:13 p.m.

Cindy Marabito (The Dicks From Texas)

SPB: Living in Austin and being a part of South by Southwest for the last several years, I'm often struck by the, what I might label, "niche" music documentaries that pop up, in seemingly increasing numbers, from year to year.  How would you assess the market for these types of documentaries, have things gotten better in recent years due to the popularity of streaming video?

Cindy: Well, I’m no expert on the film market. My own experience in film was shaped by the great art and experimental films screened all over UT campus, Dobie Mall and the Varsity Theater on the drag. In those days, film was everywhere. We were all students.

I’m struck by the mass accessibility (i.e. streaming, etc.) to both documentaries and narrative as well as the ease and affordability for filmmakers to create new works. In light of contemporary convenience and platforms, the influence of these great films seems to be missing. Occasionally, there will be a showing, but nothing in comparison to back in the day when an Austin film lover could see a great film at almost any time of the day. In my own film, The Dicks From Texas, I tried to portray a capsule of Austin, TX “good old days.” It would be nice to experience another revolution in cinema. I’m sure game for that.

One Question Interviews

Great Cynics

Posted Dec. 5, 2017, 1:11 p.m.

SPB: What do you think of bands playing albums-in-full as a tour concept?

Great Cynics: We think it's great! If it's a celebration of that album then more power to them. It's always strange going back to something you did in the past. You realise how much you've changed as a person and/or musician. It's a bit like dipping your toes into the past. Concept tour or not it's (mostly) awesome to see when bands do it! Haha! 

 

Patrick Higgins

One Question Interviews

Patrick Higgins

Posted Dec. 5, 2017, 1:09 p.m.

SPB: Has the change to more headphone listening of music changed you compose or mix your work?

Higgins: I can't say that the prevalence of headphones per se has changed how I compose or mix, but in general I am always very concerned by the spatial and immersive quality of my recordings, aiming for maximum depth and a sense of envelopment. The biggest challenge is more the common listening practice through small laptop speakers. So often the goal is get a mix that sounds compelling or accurate or powerful through shitty little speakers, and the headphones are often a reward! 

Headphone listening is naturally more immersive and has a wider stereo field, because the ears are cutoff from a room or outside environment. I think my goal is make music that is produced with enough power and energy and space that it can work well in all of these settings. It's also fun to think about people walking around and listening to your music on headphones, in totally mundane or bizarre settings of daily life; I'm particularly into that fantasy because so much of my work would be really disfiguring and disturbing against a backdrop of "normal" life---- but this seems quite beautiful potentially too.

One Question Interviews

Abrams

Posted Nov. 13, 2017, 1:02 p.m.

Taylor Iversen (Abrams)


SPB: What’s your favorite stretch of highway to drive in the US?

Taylor: When we were leaving Joshua Tree after our most recent show there, some sagely person told us to take a scenic route to get to where we were going. 

We ended up cutting through the Mojave National Preserve on our way up to SLC. We spent some timeless period driving past endless sun scorched deserts, hills, and cacti while listening to Kyuss, Queens of the Stone Age, and the Desert Sessions the whole way. After some immeasurable length of time, we spilled out onto Interstate 15, cut through Vegas, and were in Salt Lake City for our show many hours later. 

I couldn't tell you what the name of the road was, and I'm just fine with that. Something like that doesn't need a name. 

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