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Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.
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We post a variety of features in recurring series – click below to browse them.

From the archive...
Lagwagon

One Question Interviews

Lagwagon

Posted Oct. 9, 2015, 5:42 p.m.

Joey Cape (Lagwagon, solo) SPB: What is the biggest improvement you’ve made to your touring lifestyle over the years? Is there an area of comfort or economy where you’d drastically changed your approach? Cape: Surrounding myself with good people.  People who enjoy this life. They need to be happy, patient, and comfortable with constant change and unpredictable situations. A sense of humor is the first step. Also teeth brushing and deodorant can be nice.

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KFAI - Roar of the Underground

One Question Interviews

Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.

Anthem Grief

One Question Interviews

Anthem Grief

Posted July 21, 2019, 9:46 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Anthem Grief

SPB: The two of you recorded the album on your own. How does the band’s live setup work?

Anthem Grief: The two of us met through a previous band that was around for a short time. The two of us were the only ones who really clicked in that band. Throughout the years after that project was finished, Gee took me under his wing and we discovered how parallel our writing styles were. We thought, “Fuck it , we are going to do this completely backwards; we’ll write the entire record by ourselves, record it , then we will find others that can put up with us. So, to answer your question...we don’t play live yet; it’s been a long year jam packed with lots of changes and we are just now getting back to writing and finding the missing pieces.

Good Riddance

One Question Interviews

Good Riddance

Posted June 28, 2019, 10:39 p.m.

Russ (Good Riddance)

SPB: What do you remember of playing your first live show?

Russ: I remember it being euphoric, the sense of watching people move and go crazy to the music my band was playing. 

We weren’t very good at our instruments then, but it didn’t seem to matter. 

Almost our entire set consisted of Sex Pistols covers I’d cajoled the others into playing, but it still felt like it was our music, our show. 

I remember we ran out of songs, but we didn’t want to stop playing, and we couldn’t wait to do it again. 

Martin Bisi

One Question Interviews

Martin Bisi

Posted June 24, 2019, 9:31 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Martin Bisi

SPB: What is your preferred guitar model for personal playing, and how has your production work affected that choice?

Bisi: I started way late on guitar. I was a drummer during my teens, through my early years recording. It was drumming that helped me work with the early hip-hop I did (Afrika Bambaataa, "Rockit," etc.) And I also had mind towards fx and sampling with my drumming. Sometime in the mid-late '80s I veered away from hip-hop and very avant-garde stuff, and did my first rock bands, like Sonic Youth and Live Skull.

Soon after this, in the early '90s, I got the bug for picking up guitar. I felt that in the music I was interested in, there wasn't a place for me as a drummer and how I played. At first I started with fucked up guitars and weird ad hoc tunings – jeez, I wonder where that came from. But soon with grunge-era, big-but-heavy guitar sounds, I needed something with solid bottom, strong output, easy to move around the neck. Some bands I worked with that were heavy, leaning toward math, used an SG – particularly Duane Trower in Season To Risk whom I recorded in '93. His was a '65 SG. So that's where I went, and still am. I have an Epiphone SG though – I want to be safe on the cost because of touring, flying, etc.
---

Check out BC35 Volume Two: The 35 Year Anniversary of BC Studio, a tribute to Martin and his studio.

Photo by Joan Hacker

Batshit Crazy

One Question Interviews

Batshit Crazy

Posted June 23, 2019, 2:21 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Chuck (Batshit Crazy – guitar)

SPB: What kind of guitar do you use, and how/why did you choose this one?  

Chuck: For the Batshit Crazy record I totally stumbled into using this DEAN guitar. The background of the guitar is I used to own a Recording & Rehearsal studio and I had bought a cheap Dean guitar (not even sure of the model) for literally like $150 (with shipping) just to rent to bands who may need one last minute or as a fill in if someone broke a string and didn't want to take the time to change one. Well, as I began writing songs for this band, I had the Dean sitting in the corner and it was the only guitar of mine not in a case (never bothered to buy one for it because the case would be worth more than the guitar) so I grabbed it and used it to write and demo the songs. When it was time to record I tried going through all my other guitars, even borrowed a real nice Fender Strat from a buddy but something was amiss. The tone was so good on the Dean demos that I ended going back to it and using it on the whole album. The only thing I did was put on some new Ernie Ball Super Slinky strings (10's if I remember right) and muffled my Orange Rockerverb 50 amp into a little corner in my home studio. The only other thing I can come up with is, so many people have played on that guitar over the years that it had been tweaked so many times it literally was dialed in to perfection. Either that or the thing is possessed which worked out great for a horror punk record!

Repeater Records

One Question Interviews

Repeater Records

Posted June 10, 2019, 9:57 p.m.

Seth Babb and Chris Berry (Repeater Records)

SPB: What stood out to you most in the reissue process as you revisited Gospel’s The Moon Is a Dead World?  

Repeater: The thing that really stood out putting out the reissue of “The Moon is a Dead World” was just how well this album holds up. Everything about it, the songs obviously, but all the other parts as well from the artwork to the recording it still feels like such a cohesive piece of art.

Learning Curve Records

One Question Interviews

Learning Curve Records

Posted June 9, 2019, 8:56 p.m.

Rainer Fronz (Learning Curve Records)

SPB: Besides music, what other arts interest you?

Fronz: Besides releasing records with Leaning Curve Records and searching the internet/basement shows for new dirgey bands, I have some other things I like and love.

First off as far as a huge interest and effort go to my kid. She is the best thing ever. I love hanging and playing with her on a daily basis. She is very interested in listening to music and experimenting with instruments. It is amazing to watch her grow and develop her mind right in front of us.

I am also an avid gardener. I love planting vegetables and flowers and watching them grow. It is very peaceful to watch plants go thru their life process. It is also very satisfying to enjoy the fruits of your labor all summer and fall.

Things that are not music but the same breed of obsession include comics (mainly Marvel) and baseball. Go, Twins.

That pretty much sums up the life of Rainer!

Reunions

One Question Interviews

Reunions

Posted June 4, 2019, 9:05 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Eric Saylor (Reunions – guitar/vocals)

SPB: Can you walk us through your guitar gear?

Saylor: I have two pretty distinct setups I like to run; both are pretty basic. Most of the time I'll run my LTD EC-1000 into a Mesa DC-10 paired with an oversized Mesa 4x12. I've spent a lot of time in bands that tune real low and use a lot of gain so this is definitely a somewhat weird combo for what Reunions does. Most people associate Mesa with the Rectifier or Mark series amps but this really sits in a strange place in between the two of those. In my experience, it's a little closer to the Mark-IV but just not quite the same. It doesn't have that over-compressed thing I feel like Rectos do but still palm mutes super tight (which I use way too much) just in a more organic way if that makes sense. I love ESP's LTD series, they're way better than anything Epiphone and I think above a lot of Gibson branded stuff. People should overlook the metalcore association. Pickups in there are just pretty basic Duncan JBs if I'm remembering the last time I switched correctly. 

The other I like to use is an American Telecaster with a Bare Kunckle Pile Driver into an early 80's Peavey Rock Master with the same Mesa 4x12 because V30s are the best speaker and Mesa cabs are just my favorite I've ever used. I think there's something about being oversized that beefs everything up really nice too. This combo works really well for the more indie aspects Reunions but the Pile Driver's are a pretty hot tele pickup to still up the punx. When we record I really like to use these two together for all rhythm tracks."

The Contenders

One Question Interviews

The Contenders

Posted June 2, 2019, 11:42 a.m.
What's That Noise?

Fotis Tzanakis (The Contenders – guitar)

SPB: Can you walk us through your guitar gear?

Tzanakis: Here's a more detailed way of how I come to the sound for my guitar playing for Contenders: I play a Peerless solid body. I treat recordings and gigs quite differently when it comes to how my guitar will sound. 

Both at recordings and gigs I aim to keep my sound as simple as possible. This means no effect pedals. I tend to record with a Fender Twin Reverb '65 reissue. It is a very "classic" amp that comes the closest to the sound I want to approach with my songs. When it comes to gigs, given the fact that we very rarely tour outside of Athens, Greece, I opt to choose the amp I'll play keeping the space we'll be playing in mind. 

Now as far as how I go approaching the sound is this: Having the role of the rhythm guitarist in the band I want my guitar to have more mids and less bass, but not to the point it sounds "too thin." So I usually set treble: 3.5, middle, 6,, bass: 4,5, reverb: 2. These settings work for me on Fender Twin Reverb '65 but they might slightly vary. Then I also play with knobs of my guitar to add a little more details.

Guerrilla Ghosts

One Question Interviews

Guerrilla Ghosts

Posted May 31, 2019, 7:43 p.m.

Martin Defatte (Guerilla Ghosts)

SPB: Who is your favorite artist to see live?

Defatte: My favorite artist to see live these days would have to be Carnage the Executioner. Living in the Twin Cities, Milwaukee ends up being a tour stop for him a few times a year. I first saw him... must be 13-14 years ago now. Lately, he's been foregoing DJs and backing tracks and handling his musical accompaniment by beatboxing and making noise into a series of loopers and guitar pedals. It's quite a site to see. I've seen him rock the Cactus Club for nearly two hours... all on-the-fly. I like to describe him as a combination of Michael Winslow from Police Academy (you know, the guy who makes all the weird sound effects with his mouth) and The Fat Boys' style Human Beat Box. Mix that, with a looper pedal and a master class in emceeing and that's one hell of a show.

Check him out next time he comes to your town:

Bullet Treatment

One Question Interviews

Bullet Treatment

Posted May 28, 2019, 8:31 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Chuck (Bullet Treatment – guitar)

SPB: What kind of guitar do you use, and how/why did you choose this one?  

Chuck: My main guitar is a Gibson Epiphone Les Paul Model, it wasn't necessarily the guitar I set out to use but I like to try and buy cheaper guitars and then modify them to get a specific sound. I don't want to get something real nice and then start digging in them, haha.

For this guitar, I originally bought it because it was lighter in weight and I preferred that over a legit Les Paul. What I ended up doing was I had a friend of mine who is a custom pick up maker duplicate the specs for a p90 and replace the pickups in the guitar. I like the noise and activity from those classic p90's and I then had him use a black wrap as to match the guitar (it's black with ivory trim). What ended up happening was that combination made for a killer sound. So much so, I started having other guitar players asking me how I got that Epiphone to sound like that. For some reason those handmade pickups in that body through my Marshall JCM 900 just nailed that punk rock tone I was looking for and it was done on the cheap!

King Buffalo

One Question Interviews

King Buffalo

Posted May 13, 2019, 8:48 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Sean McVay (King Buffalo - guitar)

SPB: What model of guitar do you play and how did you choose it?

McVay: My main guitar is a Hagstrom Deluxe D2f. I found it dirt cheap at a local shop in Rochester and thought it looked interesting. It played well so I bought it and swapped out the pickups and fell in love.

The Secret

One Question Interviews

The Secret

Posted May 12, 2019, 9 p.m.

Michael Bertoldini (The Secret)

SPB: The band didn’t see each other or communicate with each other for years prior to the new EP -- What brought you back together and how did you then move forward with creating new music?

Bertoldini: Our friends that run Venezia Hardcore Fest really pushed hard to have The Secret to reunite for one show at their festival and after 3 years we "gave up" and accepted to play. I think times were ripe enough to bury our grudges and play some music together again. Most of the music that is in "Lux Tenebris" was already composed before we decided to reunite, only the first track "Vertigo" has been written after deciding to play together again. Since we now live in different countries we couldn't practice before recording. We met each other for the first time after years in the studio, reworked the material I had and after a couple of sessions the EP was ready. This was a completely new way to work for us.

Time and Pressure

One Question Interviews

Time and Pressure

Posted May 11, 2019, 9:42 p.m.

Travis (Time and Pressure – drums)

SPB: What do your parents think of your music? 

Travis: This is funny because none of our parents have checked out Time & Pressure -- although James' mom and Dave's family buy our merch! 

Personally, my parents have probably came to like 2 or 3 of my shows ever since I was about 16 and playing in bands. I've asked my Dad who is very "country" and my Mom is who is very "middle-aged conservative" what they thought of my music before, and they've always expressed a dislike for the speed and screaming...

My Mom and Dad hardly ask about it, and really show no interest in listening to the actual music, aside from asking for a sticker or t-shirt. Hell, maybe they have jammed our Demo and I am not even aware. But, I can tell you that they're aware of what my band sounds like, the music I've been into for years, and the shows I play/attend. I feel like my Dad thinks it's cool, just not for him -- and my Mom thinks it's silly, and can't understand how I am still into something like hardcore. Either way, they've always been supportive, and never made me feel like they didn't approve. 

Nueva Fuerza

One Question Interviews

Nueva Fuerza

Posted April 30, 2019, 9:19 p.m.

David (Nueva Fuerza)

SPB: What is your favorite cover to play? Why? 

David: Our favourite cover to play is DYS - “Open Up.” We haven't played it in a long time now but it used to be in every set. That intro with the bass is amazing, and the Boston-style riffs... Who doesn't like that? I think we wanted to be a band that sounds a lot like DYS but we ended up being very different! 

Small Million

One Question Interviews

Small Million

Posted April 29, 2019, 9:15 p.m.

Small Million

SPB: Can you enjoy the work of a musician if you disagree with their politics?   

Malachi: I don’t need to agree with someone 100% to enjoy their music, but I do think that I’m most drawn to art that shows empathy and a willingness to ask questions, regardless of politics. I think it comes down to hearing a worldview I can connect with rather than someone’s specific political beliefs. 

Ryan: I don’t generally go for music that feels overtly political regardless of what side someone’s on, because those songs can be so specific that they feel dated pretty quickly. I prefer songs that find some universal truth within the specifics of a political moment.

United Ghosts

One Question Interviews

United Ghosts

Posted April 27, 2019, 9:32 p.m.

United Ghosts

SPB: What was your first tape, record, or CD (as applicable)?   

Axel: Best of The Beatles 67-70 (the blue double album) I was about 9 and growing up in a tiny town in Germany where there wasn't a record shop, but the appliance store had a shelf with about 20 albums and that was one of them. My friend bought the 62-66 equivalent (the red double album), so we were forever arguing which is better. I still think I won, just on the strength of the mad psychedelic bangers on my one – “I Am The Walrus” and “Strawberry Fields” blew my little mind! 

Sha: It's a Small World and Elton John Crocodile Rock records from my mom ;) First cd probably U2 or The Cure...

NIET

One Question Interviews

NIET

Posted April 17, 2019, 9:48 p.m.

Ivo (NIET – vocals/guitar)

SPB: How do you choose your album art?   

Ivo: Well, we didn't choose the artwork but we have choosen the artist. We really like to promote other artist in our hometown and so we asked to Ludovica if she wanted to think about the entire artwork of the EP.

We really like her style, mix of manga and other stuff. her characters always live in inner tensions that reflect a lot the nervousness of our record. 

Her artwork fit perfectly with the sound of the album. Well done Ludo!  

Lazerbeak

One Question Interviews

Lazerbeak

Posted April 17, 2019, 8:49 p.m.

Lazerbeak (Doomtree)

SPB: What strikes you as the biggest evolution in your production since you started to today?

Lazerbeak: When I first got into producing my biggest concern was always having a stockpile of beats for many artists to choose from. I wasn't custom making tracks specifically for each artist. I just figured as long as I always had a huge vault of varied options there would always be something for everyone. As I grew into the role of a producer I realized that my best work comes from giving myself fully to a project and being very intentional about what I'm trying to create from the jump. Now I don't start making something unless I know who and what it's for – and, by focusing in more on the end result in the beginning, it's really elevated the work and made for much more meaningful collaborations. 

Orphanage Named Earth

One Question Interviews

Orphanage Named Earth

Posted April 14, 2019, 8:53 p.m.

Orphanage Named Earth

SPB: If you could change just one thing in the human mindset today, what would it be and why?   

The desire to form hierarchy in the society. Once food became commodity and civilisation as we know it arrived, humans formed hierarchy and those in power started to control those less fortunate. This led to exploitation, slavery and racism. The worst things humans can do to each other. We should learn from the tribal peoples of the past and of today, who live their lives with no hierarchy thus not being familiar with concepts like classes, prisons, suicide, depression and poverty. We have one life on one planet and should respect each other.

Darko

One Question Interviews

Darko

Posted March 27, 2019, 8:02 p.m.

Rob Piper (Darko-guitar)

SPB: Do you get nervous before you play a show? 

Piper: When I first started playing live in my early teens, I got so scared that I could hardly hold the instrument. The more I played, the less nervous I got, but it still depended on how prepared I was. If I was playing solo shows I would be super nervous, but with a Darko show it's pretty chill as we have played the set a fair few times! That was until we started playing the bigger stages like Punk Rock Holiday and Manchester Punk Festival. When the sound's that massive people can actually hear all the nuances and slips so I get some serious flutters, but bloody love it.

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