Features One Question Interviews

Feature categories

One Question Interviews

Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.
» Browse 719 features

Interviews

An in-depth discussion with a band or artist, generally in the form of a straight Q&A – no editorializing.
» Browse 346 features

Music

Album streams, our Set List "top five..." features, our year-end "best of" lists and other music-related miscellany.
» Browse 163 features

Regular Columns

Contributions on a range of topics from a range of industry figures: musicians, filmmakers, editors and more.
» Browse 59 features

Other Reviews

A melting pot of mixed content: movie, book and even video game reviews. Updated sporadically, but eclectically.
» Browse 12 features

Upcoming Talent

A semi-regular column exploring new and rising local bands and artists deserving of attention.
» Browse 9 features

Advertisement
KFAI - Root Of All Evil
Search for features

Regular series

We post a variety of features in recurring series – click below to browse them.

From the archive...
Midnight Masses

One Question Interviews

Midnight Masses

Posted Sept. 8, 2014, 12:36 a.m.

Autry Fulbright II (Midnight Masses, …And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead) SPB: How did you settle on the name Midnight Masses for the project? Fulbright II: My dad was raised Catholic and my favorite Black Sabbath song is “War Pigs” ("generals gathered in their masses/just like witches at black masses").

Advertisement
KFAI - Roar of the Underground

One Question Interviews

Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.

King Buffalo

One Question Interviews

King Buffalo

Posted May 13, 2019, 8:48 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Sean McVay (King Buffalo - guitar)

SPB: What model of guitar do you play and how did you choose it?

McVay: My main guitar is a Hagstrom Deluxe D2f. I found it dirt cheap at a local shop in Rochester and thought it looked interesting. It played well so I bought it and swapped out the pickups and fell in love.

The Secret

One Question Interviews

The Secret

Posted May 12, 2019, 9 p.m.

Michael Bertoldini (The Secret)

SPB: The band didn’t see each other or communicate with each other for years prior to the new EP -- What brought you back together and how did you then move forward with creating new music?

Bertoldini: Our friends that run Venezia Hardcore Fest really pushed hard to have The Secret to reunite for one show at their festival and after 3 years we "gave up" and accepted to play. I think times were ripe enough to bury our grudges and play some music together again. Most of the music that is in "Lux Tenebris" was already composed before we decided to reunite, only the first track "Vertigo" has been written after deciding to play together again. Since we now live in different countries we couldn't practice before recording. We met each other for the first time after years in the studio, reworked the material I had and after a couple of sessions the EP was ready. This was a completely new way to work for us.

Time and Pressure

One Question Interviews

Time and Pressure

Posted May 11, 2019, 9:42 p.m.

Travis (Time and Pressure – drums)

SPB: What do your parents think of your music? 

Travis: This is funny because none of our parents have checked out Time & Pressure -- although James' mom and Dave's family buy our merch! 

Personally, my parents have probably came to like 2 or 3 of my shows ever since I was about 16 and playing in bands. I've asked my Dad who is very "country" and my Mom is who is very "middle-aged conservative" what they thought of my music before, and they've always expressed a dislike for the speed and screaming...

My Mom and Dad hardly ask about it, and really show no interest in listening to the actual music, aside from asking for a sticker or t-shirt. Hell, maybe they have jammed our Demo and I am not even aware. But, I can tell you that they're aware of what my band sounds like, the music I've been into for years, and the shows I play/attend. I feel like my Dad thinks it's cool, just not for him -- and my Mom thinks it's silly, and can't understand how I am still into something like hardcore. Either way, they've always been supportive, and never made me feel like they didn't approve. 

Nueva Fuerza

One Question Interviews

Nueva Fuerza

Posted April 30, 2019, 9:19 p.m.

David (Nueva Fuerza)

SPB: What is your favorite cover to play? Why? 

David: Our favourite cover to play is DYS - “Open Up.” We haven't played it in a long time now but it used to be in every set. That intro with the bass is amazing, and the Boston-style riffs... Who doesn't like that? I think we wanted to be a band that sounds a lot like DYS but we ended up being very different! 

Small Million

One Question Interviews

Small Million

Posted April 29, 2019, 9:15 p.m.

Small Million

SPB: Can you enjoy the work of a musician if you disagree with their politics?   

Malachi: I don’t need to agree with someone 100% to enjoy their music, but I do think that I’m most drawn to art that shows empathy and a willingness to ask questions, regardless of politics. I think it comes down to hearing a worldview I can connect with rather than someone’s specific political beliefs. 

Ryan: I don’t generally go for music that feels overtly political regardless of what side someone’s on, because those songs can be so specific that they feel dated pretty quickly. I prefer songs that find some universal truth within the specifics of a political moment.

United Ghosts

One Question Interviews

United Ghosts

Posted April 27, 2019, 9:32 p.m.

United Ghosts

SPB: What was your first tape, record, or CD (as applicable)?   

Axel: Best of The Beatles 67-70 (the blue double album) I was about 9 and growing up in a tiny town in Germany where there wasn't a record shop, but the appliance store had a shelf with about 20 albums and that was one of them. My friend bought the 62-66 equivalent (the red double album), so we were forever arguing which is better. I still think I won, just on the strength of the mad psychedelic bangers on my one – “I Am The Walrus” and “Strawberry Fields” blew my little mind! 

Sha: It's a Small World and Elton John Crocodile Rock records from my mom ;) First cd probably U2 or The Cure...

NIET

One Question Interviews

NIET

Posted April 17, 2019, 9:48 p.m.

Ivo (NIET – vocals/guitar)

SPB: How do you choose your album art?   

Ivo: Well, we didn't choose the artwork but we have choosen the artist. We really like to promote other artist in our hometown and so we asked to Ludovica if she wanted to think about the entire artwork of the EP.

We really like her style, mix of manga and other stuff. her characters always live in inner tensions that reflect a lot the nervousness of our record. 

Her artwork fit perfectly with the sound of the album. Well done Ludo!  

Lazerbeak

One Question Interviews

Lazerbeak

Posted April 17, 2019, 8:49 p.m.

Lazerbeak (Doomtree)

SPB: What strikes you as the biggest evolution in your production since you started to today?

Lazerbeak: When I first got into producing my biggest concern was always having a stockpile of beats for many artists to choose from. I wasn't custom making tracks specifically for each artist. I just figured as long as I always had a huge vault of varied options there would always be something for everyone. As I grew into the role of a producer I realized that my best work comes from giving myself fully to a project and being very intentional about what I'm trying to create from the jump. Now I don't start making something unless I know who and what it's for – and, by focusing in more on the end result in the beginning, it's really elevated the work and made for much more meaningful collaborations. 

Orphanage Named Earth

One Question Interviews

Orphanage Named Earth

Posted April 14, 2019, 8:53 p.m.

Orphanage Named Earth

SPB: If you could change just one thing in the human mindset today, what would it be and why?   

The desire to form hierarchy in the society. Once food became commodity and civilisation as we know it arrived, humans formed hierarchy and those in power started to control those less fortunate. This led to exploitation, slavery and racism. The worst things humans can do to each other. We should learn from the tribal peoples of the past and of today, who live their lives with no hierarchy thus not being familiar with concepts like classes, prisons, suicide, depression and poverty. We have one life on one planet and should respect each other.

Darko

One Question Interviews

Darko

Posted March 27, 2019, 8:02 p.m.

Rob Piper (Darko-guitar)

SPB: Do you get nervous before you play a show? 

Piper: When I first started playing live in my early teens, I got so scared that I could hardly hold the instrument. The more I played, the less nervous I got, but it still depended on how prepared I was. If I was playing solo shows I would be super nervous, but with a Darko show it's pretty chill as we have played the set a fair few times! That was until we started playing the bigger stages like Punk Rock Holiday and Manchester Punk Festival. When the sound's that massive people can actually hear all the nuances and slips so I get some serious flutters, but bloody love it.

The Pretty Flowers

One Question Interviews

The Pretty Flowers

Posted March 25, 2019, 7:58 p.m.

Noah (The Pretty Flowers)

SPB: What do you listen to in the van?   

Noah: We started doing a band-approved music playlist on Spotify this year called Sounds from a Sony Sports Walkman and this SPB question made us realize we need to update it for Feb. January's playlist should give your readers a good idea of our varied musical tastes--along with some Pretty Flowers album tracks--and can be found here. For long stretches in the van, it's less music-oriented: Sean and I are both ride-or-die Howard Stern Show fans, so any time we have a captive audience to try to convert to the show, we take advantage of it. Jake listens to a lot of Pod Save America podcast, which we all like. Sam has been on a Game of Thrones audiobook kick lately, which is tolerated by some.

The Chairman Dances

One Question Interviews

The Chairman Dances

Posted March 24, 2019, 7:16 p.m.

Eric Kreson (The Chairman Dances)

SPB: How old were you when you first learned an instrument?   

Kreson: I was in fourth grade, so about ten years old, when I began trumpet lessons at my public school. I kept playing regularly through college. My first years of lessons were, unwittingly, my introduction to music theory, melody, harmony, and (music) history. I'm the songwriter for The Chairman Dances and, in that role, I most often sing and play guitar, though a number of our arrangements include trumpet (played by me). The Chairman Dances probably would not exist had I not studied trumpet.

Murder City Devils

One Question Interviews

Murder City Devils

Posted March 8, 2019, 5:51 p.m.

Coady (Murder City Devils)

SPB: Is there any particular older song that is frequently requested but you’d like to put to rest?

Coady: "Boom Swagger Boom" is probably the song that people comment on us not playing the most. We've always had a policy in this band that any one of us has veto power over the set list. If someone doesn't want to play a song, we don't. We want to have a good time so that everyone else can, too! We wrote a lot of songs during the lifespan of this band, so we never really saw a need to play the ones that don't feel good anymore. We used to play no more than 8 songs max at a show. When I look down at the set list and see 18-20 songs nowadays, I don't feel bad at all for leaving one or two out! We'll save them for the all-star jam at our rock n roll hall of fame induction.  

Editor's Note: This 1QI took place a few years ago but was mis-filed and only recently discovered in the archives.

Qui

One Question Interviews

Qui

Posted March 7, 2019, 8:52 p.m.
What's That Noise?

Matt Cronk (Qui)

SPB: What kind of guitar do you use and how did you come to this choice?   

Cronk: What a fun question! I love guitars and can go on and on about them, ad infinitum. I have several that rotate in and out but if I had to pick one, it would be my ‘99 Gibson Les Paul Deluxe Reissue. It is totally stock with no modifications or breaks. It is on the heavier side but that doesn’t bother me as much as it does some players. For me, part of what makes Les Pauls so comfortable is their weight and balance. I have had other, lighter, LPs that were chambered to reduce the weight and the balance was all wrong. It made the guitar neck-heavy and uncomfortable. Also, the lack of heft in the body had a horrible effect on the tone of the guitar. It sounded wimpy and hollow, which is not what I want from a Les Paul. My ‘99 hangs perfectly and has a really deep tonal character. Interestingly, the mini-humbucker pickups that are so often reviled by most players have a unique tone that I’ve grown very fond of. They are low-output, which I generally don’t like, but still drive my amps well without being overbearing and are, in fact, very dynamic and musical. It is finished in wine red. That is special to me because the first guitar I ever touched was my uncle’s wine red Les Paul standard when I was 6. 

Burnt Tapes

One Question Interviews

Burnt Tapes

Posted March 3, 2019, 12:01 p.m.

Burnt Tapes (Pan T-guitar/vocals)

SPB: Do you get nervous before you play a show? 

Pan T: Yeah for sure, even after years of playing shows I still feel differing amounts of anxiety before going on stage. I think it’s something that for most people never really goes away – there will always be a certain amount of nerves when performing, be it playing to 5 people or 500.

For me I know certain factors exacerbate it – stressful travel to the venue, a rushed soundcheck, alcohol, a last minute setlist change, how I’ve been feeling prior to the show – so I’ll try and control what I can and accept what I can’t change. One thing that does change as you play more shows, is that you (hopefully) get better at playing your instrument and (again hopefully) become more confident and therefore less nervous. Having said that, some shows are truly nerve-wracking and sometimes I look down and see what appear to be sausage fingers clawing at my guitar.

Here’s what I do to try and reduce nerves:

  • Arrive at the venue early but not too early - Too rushed and I’m in the wrong headspace. Too long and I’ve had too much time to think about things that could go wrong. Go for a walk outside before you play to clear your mind.
  • If you have to soundcheck – Don’t be rushed by the sound engineer, be respectful and be honest about how yes you really do need more of your own guitar in your monitor.
  • Don’t eat or drink too much – A light meal 2 hrs before is perfect and maybe one beer to loosen up.
  • Warm up - Stretch your fingers/arms/legs/whatever and if you can, actually practice on your instrument before you play. Vocal warm ups help too – be it singing along to the opening bands or screaming to yourself like a lunatic in the venue toilets.
  • Remember you are not alone – Don’t forget you are playing with other people who are mostly like as nervous as you. It’s quite an accomplishment to keep everyone playing along to the same song at the same time so accept you are on a rickety ass roller-coaster held together with string and sellotape.
  • Don’t sweat mistakes – Most people in the crowd don’t care or even notice small mistakes which to you may seem major. I totally fucked up a guitar lead once and someone told me it was a very “jazzy solo” and since then I don’t really care when I fuck things up. Remember you are human and make mistakes.
  • When you are not playing shows - Practice your instrument alone and practice your set as a band.
     

Burnt Tapes released Never Better (Lockjaw Records/Wiretap Records) on Feb. 22.

Ogikubo Station

One Question Interviews

Ogikubo Station

Posted Jan. 30, 2019, 8:05 p.m.

Maura (Ogikubo Station)

SPB: How did Ogikubo Station come to be? 

Maura: I was visiting my sister in Oakland and hanging out with my friend Danielle Bailey from the band Jabber in San Jose.  Danny had posted some photos of us hanging out and Mike called Danny to ask if I'd sing some vocals on a song he was working on.  After the listening back to the song, we both kind of went, "Our voices sound really good together."  It was just a one-time thing, but then 3 years later, Mike asked if I'd be interested in doing a full record together and so Ogikubo Station was born. 

Good Touch

One Question Interviews

Good Touch

Posted Jan. 29, 2019, 7:12 p.m.

Good Touch

SPB: What do your parents think of your music? (Related: Are they likely to read this?) 

Adrien: My mom has always been supportive. Like a lot of older folks, she wishes we'd write a "one hit wonder," haha.

She's more likely to read it if I show it to her.

Jason: They appreciate my musical ability, but they're not into punk rock. 

They're not likely to read this interview. 

Wade: My folks are supportive, and probably won't read an interview unless I show them where to find it. 

Brian: My answer would be generally supportive but disassociated. And no. 

American Steel

One Question Interviews

American Steel

Posted Jan. 27, 2019, 7:45 p.m.

John Peck (American Steel)

SPB: With the band spread out geographically, how did you approach writing the new material? How was it different than songwriting in the past?

Peck: As we started preparing for our recent shows, we added one new song each from Ryan and Rory to our rehearsals. With me living overseas, practicing these songs (and indeed practicing in general) was particularly challenging. Ryan, Rory and Scott recorded demos of the new songs with scratch bass tracks, which I used to learn them and write my own parts. While it meant more work for everyone, demoing the songs and listening back to them ended up being beneficial to the recording process. For the actual recording, the drums were tracked in Oakland with scratch bass, bass was tracked in Berlin and sent back to be added to the mix, and the final guitar and vocal tracks were added at the end. 

Coarse

One Question Interviews

Coarse

Posted Jan. 19, 2019, 4 a.m.

Ryan Knowles (Coarse)

SPB: A goal with this band was to be distinct from previous projects. To follow-through on this, did you change your overall approach or mostly just the musical style elements? 

Ryan: We did change our entire approach to this project, in all aspects really. We quite literally forced ourselves into this small room that felt like a cage and forced ourselves to make something completely out of the box. It’s ironic in a sense. Everything that I had done prior to this personally was so controlled by other people. A lot of ideas I was passionate about got snipped in the bud early on because it didn’t fit the mold for what someone else desired. With Coarse, we had no boundaries for what it could be, outside of the fact that we wanted it to be extremely aggressive and chaotic. I truly think the instrumentation and vocal cadences, as well as the lyrics Brandon wrote truly brought out those desires we had.

We may joke about it a lot, but lock boxes of weed delivered by bike, Bud Light Lime, and way too many trips to the local bodega was a huge element of the creative process. We didn’t have money for anything -- I mean we literally bought studio monitors and returned them so we could record the demos in the first place. It’s gritty and rough around the edges, but extremely calculated at the same time. We would mouth riffs and drum beats out loud to each other that sounded like nonsense in some lackluster attempt to convey an idea, and somehow we understood each other. It was crazy: like I would hear a riff in my head and basically speak it out loud to Brandon and he’d be looking at me like, “What the fuck are you saying?” Then I would go track it and that would be the next part of the song.

The most ridiculous part about the writing of it was if we got stuck on what to do next we would look at each other and be like, “Blast beat?” and then just continue on from there. There are elements of Brandon and I’s prior bands in this EP, but that’s because we are channeling ourselves, and those nuances that may feel familiar were our personal inputs on those bands. So yeah, I guess you could say we did change our approach just a little bit. Haha.

(Photo by Angela Owens)

Maniac

One Question Interviews

Maniac

Posted Jan. 19, 2019, 3:55 a.m.

Zache (Maniac)

SPB: The title track on the new album is a bit of a departure in sound from the rest of the album. What’s the story behind this song? 

Zache: My Dad died of cancer on October 29, 2013, two days after Lou Reed. Pretty quickly after I had the lyrics, “And we all join the dead dad’s club,” but nothing else. 

Everything I wrote felt cheap and forced. I remember flying back to LA after visiting my family in 2016—something about flying always makes me emotional. I wrote a stream of consciousness about being in hospice with my Dad and watching him die, and that became the lyrics to “Dead Dance Club.” 

My Dad had what some might call whacky eyebrows, and while I watched him die, he couldn’t talk but instead kept raising his eyebrows, almost apologetically. So I wanted to call the song “Elegy for Eyebrows,” which the other guys weren’t super stoked on. But they went with it because who’s going to fight you about the title of a song about your Dad dying? Right after we got mixes back, I sent the song to family and a few close friends. One of those friends was Alexandra in Puerto Rico and she said, “Dead Dance Club, I love it!” I told the band and we all agreed that was a much better name for the song and a pretty sick name for a record. 

All One Question Interviews

2

3

6

8

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

R

R

S

T

T

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Æ

x

Logo

Looking for the SPB logo? You can download it in a range of styles and colours here:

Click anywhere outside this dialog to close it, or press escape.