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Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.
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From the archive...
6131 Records

One Question Interviews

6131 Records

Posted July 25, 2014, 12:30 p.m.

Sean Rhorer (6131 Records) SPB: What’s your favorite cover song to listen to/see performed? Rhorer: I'm not a huge fan of covers, but it's hard not to love the Quicksand cover of The Smiths song "How Soon Is Now?" The Smiths are my favorite band, but this is actually one of my least favorite songs from their catalogue, so hearing a revamped version courtesy of Walter and gang is great.  Arguably, it's a better version than the original, although it would have been cool to hear their take on the full version as opposed to ...

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Radio K 2

One Question Interviews

Quite literally, a one question interview. Also known as 1QIs, we post these first to our social media on a near-daily basis, with the archival piece here. Check 'em out.

Ogikubo Station

One Question Interviews

Ogikubo Station

Posted Jan. 30, 2019, 8:05 p.m.

Maura (Ogikubo Station)

SPB: How did Ogikubo Station come to be? 

Maura: I was visiting my sister in Oakland and hanging out with my friend Danielle Bailey from the band Jabber in San Jose.  Danny had posted some photos of us hanging out and Mike called Danny to ask if I'd sing some vocals on a song he was working on.  After the listening back to the song, we both kind of went, "Our voices sound really good together."  It was just a one-time thing, but then 3 years later, Mike asked if I'd be interested in doing a full record together and so Ogikubo Station was born. 

Good Touch

One Question Interviews

Good Touch

Posted Jan. 29, 2019, 7:12 p.m.

Good Touch

SPB: What do your parents think of your music? (Related: Are they likely to read this?) 

Adrien: My mom has always been supportive. Like a lot of older folks, she wishes we'd write a "one hit wonder," haha.

She's more likely to read it if I show it to her.

Jason: They appreciate my musical ability, but they're not into punk rock. 

They're not likely to read this interview. 

Wade: My folks are supportive, and probably won't read an interview unless I show them where to find it. 

Brian: My answer would be generally supportive but disassociated. And no. 

American Steel

One Question Interviews

American Steel

Posted Jan. 27, 2019, 7:45 p.m.

John Peck (American Steel)

SPB: With the band spread out geographically, how did you approach writing the new material? How was it different than songwriting in the past?

Peck: As we started preparing for our recent shows, we added one new song each from Ryan and Rory to our rehearsals. With me living overseas, practicing these songs (and indeed practicing in general) was particularly challenging. Ryan, Rory and Scott recorded demos of the new songs with scratch bass tracks, which I used to learn them and write my own parts. While it meant more work for everyone, demoing the songs and listening back to them ended up being beneficial to the recording process. For the actual recording, the drums were tracked in Oakland with scratch bass, bass was tracked in Berlin and sent back to be added to the mix, and the final guitar and vocal tracks were added at the end. 

Coarse

One Question Interviews

Coarse

Posted Jan. 19, 2019, 4 a.m.

Ryan Knowles (Coarse)

SPB: A goal with this band was to be distinct from previous projects. To follow-through on this, did you change your overall approach or mostly just the musical style elements? 

Ryan: We did change our entire approach to this project, in all aspects really. We quite literally forced ourselves into this small room that felt like a cage and forced ourselves to make something completely out of the box. It’s ironic in a sense. Everything that I had done prior to this personally was so controlled by other people. A lot of ideas I was passionate about got snipped in the bud early on because it didn’t fit the mold for what someone else desired. With Coarse, we had no boundaries for what it could be, outside of the fact that we wanted it to be extremely aggressive and chaotic. I truly think the instrumentation and vocal cadences, as well as the lyrics Brandon wrote truly brought out those desires we had.

We may joke about it a lot, but lock boxes of weed delivered by bike, Bud Light Lime, and way too many trips to the local bodega was a huge element of the creative process. We didn’t have money for anything -- I mean we literally bought studio monitors and returned them so we could record the demos in the first place. It’s gritty and rough around the edges, but extremely calculated at the same time. We would mouth riffs and drum beats out loud to each other that sounded like nonsense in some lackluster attempt to convey an idea, and somehow we understood each other. It was crazy: like I would hear a riff in my head and basically speak it out loud to Brandon and he’d be looking at me like, “What the fuck are you saying?” Then I would go track it and that would be the next part of the song.

The most ridiculous part about the writing of it was if we got stuck on what to do next we would look at each other and be like, “Blast beat?” and then just continue on from there. There are elements of Brandon and I’s prior bands in this EP, but that’s because we are channeling ourselves, and those nuances that may feel familiar were our personal inputs on those bands. So yeah, I guess you could say we did change our approach just a little bit. Haha.

(Photo by Angela Owens)

Maniac

One Question Interviews

Maniac

Posted Jan. 19, 2019, 3:55 a.m.

Zache (Maniac)

SPB: The title track on the new album is a bit of a departure in sound from the rest of the album. What’s the story behind this song? 

Zache: My Dad died of cancer on October 29, 2013, two days after Lou Reed. Pretty quickly after I had the lyrics, “And we all join the dead dad’s club,” but nothing else. 

Everything I wrote felt cheap and forced. I remember flying back to LA after visiting my family in 2016—something about flying always makes me emotional. I wrote a stream of consciousness about being in hospice with my Dad and watching him die, and that became the lyrics to “Dead Dance Club.” 

My Dad had what some might call whacky eyebrows, and while I watched him die, he couldn’t talk but instead kept raising his eyebrows, almost apologetically. So I wanted to call the song “Elegy for Eyebrows,” which the other guys weren’t super stoked on. But they went with it because who’s going to fight you about the title of a song about your Dad dying? Right after we got mixes back, I sent the song to family and a few close friends. One of those friends was Alexandra in Puerto Rico and she said, “Dead Dance Club, I love it!” I told the band and we all agreed that was a much better name for the song and a pretty sick name for a record. 

Delmar & the Dedications

One Question Interviews

Delmar & the Dedications

Posted Jan. 19, 2019, 3:54 a.m.

Del (Delmar & the Dedications)

SPB: What musician do you think had the greatest influence on Delmar’s sound today?  

Del: I've always been a huge fan of ‘60s girl-group pop bands, and at first, Delmar started as a cover band doing garage punk renditions of b-sides from The Chiffons, The Supremes, Lesley Gore, etc. I eventually realized that all of these songs follow a simple formula and was like, "Shit. I can write this." From there we started performing originals. We continue to write based on the ‘60s girl-group formula, but the sound has morphed into the more power-pop sensibilities of Marshall Crenshaw, Elvis Costello, and Matthew Sweet.

Larry Livermore

One Question Interviews

Larry Livermore

Posted Jan. 14, 2019, 12:28 p.m.

Larry Livermore

SPB: How do you generally find out about new music?

Livermore: Sometimes from friends, but increasingly, for the most part, nowhere.

Geld

One Question Interviews

Geld

Posted Jan. 11, 2019, 10:05 p.m.

Al (Geld – vocals)

SPB: Given that records get distributed on the internet with a global reach, and influences come in with a global reach, do you find it difficult to establish an “Australian” sound, or is it not a factor in your music? 

Al: While we do have some civic pride for Australian music (one of the few Australian things I can honestly say I'm proud of), at no point did we feel it something that needed representation. I think the immediate nature of music nowadays simply means sound/style/genre has become more of a premeditated choice rather than an environmental bestowment. [It’s] something that obviously has its share of pros and cons, but ultimately I think it's great. From a stylistic standpoint, we've been given the keys to the cuffs. To make something great and distribute it in seconds, or to fuck it up and make some sort of contrived punk Voltron.

It's up to us. Geld certainly took liberties at the international punk buffet, and because of that we were able to do something that's less of a genre band based around time, location or community, and more so reflective of the band’s relationship in an insular context (not to suggest these themes were totally unheard of pre-internet, there's always been weirdos trying to do their own thing).

With that being said, this question is null and void, as Cormac hates AC/DC, which basically disqualifies us from claiming any significant connection to this country's music.

Squarecrow

One Question Interviews

Squarecrow

Posted Jan. 10, 2019, 11:33 p.m.

Kevin White (Squarecrow – bass)

SPB: To you, what is the best thing about the San Diego scene right now?

White: It’s hard to identify. It’s just a group of musicians exhausting through a subsidiary fragmented universe of ego and alienation, entitlement and reproach, where diuretics and laxatives are employed to produce on a sidewalk; a San Diego scene.

Kælan Mikla

One Question Interviews

Kælan Mikla

Posted Dec. 3, 2018, 11:53 a.m.

Solveig Matthildur (Kælan Mikla)

SPB: How do fine arts, besides music, influence your approach to making music?

Matthildur: Art for me is like taking something from everyday life, a landscape, a situation, a thought, a dream or whatever you want to take, process it and put it out in another form. And I see it like all art and creations are divided by the senses. You can see them in fine art, films and performances, listen to them in music and poetry, feel them in sculptures and enter installations, live music performance and more. So artists are maybe a lot like instruments or a processor of reality. You put an idea or a thing to the input of the artist, they process it and from the output comes another version of that idea or a thing.

Abstracter

One Question Interviews

Abstracter

Posted Dec. 3, 2018, 11:11 a.m.

Mattia (Abstracter)

SPB: In my opinion Abstracter has adopted a more and more bleak sound over time. Do you perceive the development of Abstracter in the same way? What influences this development? 

Mattia: It is undeniable that the sound has gotten bleaker. This was the band's fate all along in some way. We just needed the right people in the lineup and sharpen the right weapons over time to make it happen and those people finally came along after some trial and error. Abstracter is a band with multiple different influences coming into play all at the same time and sometimes some overpower other ones.

It has always been like that, but now finally most of our influences have a voice and can express themselves. It's an ever-changing thing. We have a "problem" with repeating ourselves or beating the same path so we always shift and try out something new. In the first album His Hero is Gone and Jesu were dominant influences, in the second one Godflesh and Amebix and Corrupted had more a role in helping us find our sound there, and in this one Celtic Frost, Triptykon, Khanate, Blut Aus Nord, and Sutekh Hexen came to play their role in the mix, along with all the older influences still very relevant as well. Who knows, what will lead us next and where....

Avola

One Question Interviews

Avola

Posted Dec. 3, 2018, 11:09 a.m.

Avola

SPB: What stood out to you the most the first time you performed as a solo musician?

Avola: My first solo performance was in 2009. It was a Sunday afternoon. I remember a lot of anxiety. I no longer had a band of hairy folks and too many amps to distract people with. Just me hunching over my table of gear. I knew if I botched something I had better be quick to recover because I had no one to blame. I remember reminding myself how cathartic playing live had been in the past despite minor stage fright and how at the end of the set I would likely have shed some layer of pent up bad stuff through high volume noise. 

At the end I pulled it off, and the support was amazing. All these years later, I still have the same worries and anxieties I did that first time, but ultimately getting loud and weird with friends and strangers around, is fun and exciting. I look forward to many more years.

Ruby Boots

One Question Interviews

Ruby Boots

Posted Dec. 3, 2018, 11:04 a.m.

Ruby Boots

SPB: How does a musician’s politics affect your appreciation of them? Does it factor in, or can you separate the two ideas?

Ruby: I feel like using the word 'politics' as opposed to morals and values adds to the great divide that we are currently living in, I want to know where a musician stands on things like saving the planet, treating each other equally and with love and compassion, believes in equality no matter of you race, gender or sexual preference. I think that you can sit on either side of the political fence and still embrace the kind of values that work towards decent humanity. So yes, if a musician’s values work against that then it absolutely factors in because as artists we are given a voice, and make no mistake, words are more powerful than any other tool or weapon on this earth. 

Dezorah

One Question Interviews

Dezorah

Posted Dec. 3, 2018, 11:02 a.m.

Eric Martinez (Dezorah)

SPB: What kind of guitar do you use (and why did you make this choice)? 

Eric: I play a Mexican made Fender Duo Sonic (Surf Green). I chose this guitar because I wanted something tonally versatile that would not leave me completely broke. So far it has given me everything I want in a guitar and in my opinion highly compliments the bands musical style.

Barren Womb

One Question Interviews

Barren Womb

Posted Dec. 3, 2018, 11 a.m.

Tony Gonzalez (Barren Womb)

SPB: There was very little time between the first couple of Barren Womb releases. We have had to wait a bit for Old Money/New Lows. What caused the wait?

Tony: There are a couple of reasons for the gap between "Nique Everything" and "Old Money / New Lows". First of all, we were touring more in that period than we had previously, which made it more difficult to find time to write new stuff. We managed to release an acoustic EP last year though, so it wasn’t a complete dry spell by any means. Secondly, we wanted to make sure we didn’t retread familiar ground, that the material felt fresh and exciting. This gets harder to do with each subsequent release, but it’s really important for us to keep pushing into the unknown and out of our comfort zone.

Sun-0-Bathers

One Question Interviews

Sun-0-Bathers

Posted Nov. 1, 2018, 6:26 a.m.

Redmer (Sun-0-Bathers)

SPB: Sun-0-Bathers sounds very true to one particular scene or sound (and mocks a couple of others just by naming the band as you did). The more truly a band presents itself, the more it makes me wonder: what guilty pleasures are hidden? So: what are your guilty pleasures outside of your general style?

Redmer: Our guilty pleasure is not really a guilty one but more a pleasure.

We love: Wham! – “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” 

It’s the perfect party song.

Dark Oz

One Question Interviews

Dark Oz

Posted Nov. 1, 2018, 6:24 a.m.

Frank Meriwether (Dark Oz)

SPB: What is the weirdest description you’ve heard of your music? Could you see where the commenter was coming from? 

Frank: I really can't think of any weird descriptions, unfortunately, but the weirdest comparison I got was comparing our music to Genesis. I started listening to music (in a way so as to form opinions) in the early ‘90s, and even before I was ten years old I distinctly remember thinking Genesis was definitely uncool. I still think that, but I also think Peter Gabriel (especially his solo work) is an interesting songwriter. It's still pretty hard for me to listen to Peter Gabriel for an extended period of time because I don't really enjoy that type of music or production, but I can appreciate his abilities as a lyricist.

 

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers

One Question Interviews

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers

Posted Nov. 1, 2018, 6:20 a.m.

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers

SPB: Which venue has the best food for touring artists? 

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers: The Grey Eagle in Asheville, NC, those cats make dope tacos and have vegan options.

The Penske File

One Question Interviews

The Penske File

Posted Oct. 13, 2018, 5:06 a.m.

Travis (The Penske File)

SPB: Has your band ever been robbed on the road? (Did you recover any of your losses?) 

Travis: I would love to answer no to this question and be done with it, but that wouldn't be truthful. Last winter we were on tour in Europe. A few shows in, we stopped off in Milan, Italy for a gig. We found a gravy parking spot a few strides from the venue and loaded in our gear and set up for sound check as we do nightly. Following sound check, a few of us went back to the van to grab some things and noticed two windows on our rented Ford Transit had been smashed in, panic and dread set in as we rummaged the remaining remnants in the van. All of our personal bags were stolen except mine oddly enough. Jokes were immediately fired off about my bag smelling too rancid even for petty thieves. This did some good in softening the blow of the communal violation. 

At the end of the day we were lucky as all that was stolen from us was clothes and toiletries: necessities, but easily replaceable ones. The biggest kick in the pants ended up being the two broken windows which we were unable to fix, despite daily attempts, for the next two weeks. We drove through cold nights and colder mornings with the winter air assaulting our senses and were forced to load in and out the contents of the van multiple times daily and often had to leave someone in our troupe to serve as van watchdog while others went for meals, walks etc.

Along with our clothing, the thieves robbed us of a lot of the fun down time on tour, but alas did not steal our determination. We eventually were able to find a temporary solution to the windowless conundrum and finished the tour with high spirits ... more or less ;)

Barrence Whitfield & the Savages

One Question Interviews

Barrence Whitfield & the Savages

Posted Oct. 13, 2018, 5:04 a.m.

Barrence Whitfield & the Savages

SPB: What is your favorite restaurant to visit on tour?

Barrence Whitfield & the Savages: BBQ anywhere southern U.S.A

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